Aquaculture Fisheries Market Analysis and Reports | South Korea Conference Series

Market Analysis - Aquaculture Fisheries 2019

Market Analysis

Market analysis

Summary of Aquculture Conference

Aquaculture Fisheries 2019 emphases on different areas of Aquaculture. Aquaculture, or fish farming, has gained momentum as a viable method to produce seafood as demand for fresh fish has put a strain on natural populations .This Conference attempts to unite a distinctive and world-class blend of researchers, scientists, analysts and leaders both from the scholarly community and industry to trade their insight, experience and research advancements on Aquaculture and its associated domain of Fisheries.

The Conference also emphases on career opportunities within aquaculture, and most, but not all, will require some kind of degree or advanced training. Aquaculturists can find work with state and federal government agencies, on fish farms, and within academia.

Aquaculture is counted to be probably the fastest growing food-producing sector in the world currently. Farming of aquatic organisms including fish, molluscs, crustaceans and aquatic plants under controlled conditions defines Aquaculture. Aquaculture and Fisheries, has gained momentum all over the world as a viable method to produce seafood over the last decade. According to some experts, increasing demand for fresh fish has put a strain on natural populations. Consequently Aquaculture meeting is gaining prevalence in the demand.

Scope and importance of Aquaculture and fisheries

In modern times, not many primary industries have consistently recorded high yearly growth over a period of two decades. Aquaculture has sustained a global growth, continues to grow, and is expected to increasingly fill the shortfall in aquatic food products resulting from static or declining capture fisheries and population increase well into the year 2025. Its further growth and development will have to occur under a different socio-economic milieu in the new millennium. The basic paradigm changes will be from an increased production at almost any cost, to a sustainable increase in production with minimal environmental perturbations. Despite such paradigm changes, aquaculture will increasingly contribute to food security, poverty alleviation and social equity.

Why is it seoul, South korea?

South Korea occupies the southern portion of the Korean peninsula. The total land mass of the country is 98,480 km2 but usable land is only 20% of the total and thus the population is concentrated around the coast. The Korean Peninsula is surrounded by the East, West and South Seas, a coast-line that extends for about 2,413 km. Endowed with an abundance of fisheries resources, Koreans have developed a distinct seafood culture with annual per capita sea food consumption of 48.1 kg in 2005

There have been deliberate efforts to shift from the production of low value aquaculture species such as seaweeds to high value species, such as oyster in South Korea. The government has been pursuing a long-term aquaculture development programme through the expansion of areas for aquaculture and the intensified development of both profitable and unexploited species. Already certain tidal areas in the southern provinces have been designated for shellfish culture. The number of aquaculture facilities will be reduced by 10% over the next five years, and new licences will not be issued for such products as laver, sea-mustard and “excessively-produced fishes”. Another reason for the slowdown in growth is the loss of some aquaculture areas to industrial pollution, such as the case with oysters.

 Seoul has a humid continental climate, also bordering a humid subtropical climate. The suburbs of Seoul are generally cooler than the center of Seoul because of the urban heat island effect. Summers are generally hot and humid, with the East Asian monsoon taking place from June until September. August, the warmest month, has average high and low temperatures of 34.6 and 25.4 °C (94 and 78 °F) with higher temperatures possible. Winters are usually cold to freezing with average January high and low temperatures of 1.5 and −5.9 °C (34.7 and 21.4 °F) and are generally much drier than summers, with an average of 28 days of snow annually. Sometimes, temperatures drop dramatically to below −10.0 °C (14.0 °F), and on some occasions as low as −15.0 °C (5.0 °F) in the mid-winter period of January and February. Temperatures below −20.0 °C (−4.0 °F) have been recorded.

Seoul is the business and financial hub of South Korea. Although it accounts for only 0.6 percent of the nation's land area, 48.3 percent of South Korea's bank deposits were held in Seoul in 2003, and the city generated 23 percent of the country's GDP overall in 2012.In 2008 the Worldwide Centers of Commerce Index ranked Seoul No.9. The Global Financial Centres Index in 2015 listed Seoul as the 6th financially most competitive city in the world.The Economist Intelligence Unit ranked Seoul 15th in the list of "Overall 2025 City Competitiveness" regarding future competitiveness of cities.

South Korea is a major energy importer, importing nearly all of its oil needs and the second-largest importer of liquefied natural gas in the world. Electricity generation in the country mainly comes from conventional thermal power, which accounts for more than two thirds of production, and from nuclear power. Energy producers were dominated by government enterprises, although privately operated coal mines and oil refineries also existed. The National Assembly enacted a broad electricity sector restructuring program in 2000, but the restructuring process was halted amid political controversy in 2004 and remains a topic of intense political debate

Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Universities:

  • Shanghai Fisheries University, China
  • National Fisheries University, Japan
  • Agricultural University of Norway, Norway
  • Chulalongkorn University, Thailand
  • Deakin University, Victoria
  • linders University, Australia
  • Ocean University, China
  • Nagasaki University, Japan
  • Hokkaido University, Japan
  • Heriot-Watt University, United Kingdom
  • James Cook University, Australia
  • Malaspina University-College, Canada
  • Northern Territory University, Australia
  • Rhodes University, South Africa
  • State University of Ghent, Belgium
  • Shanghai Ocean University, China
  • Kyoto University, Japan

Universities in USA for Fisheries & Aquaculture:

  • Auburn University, United States.
  • Brunswick Community College, United States
  • Delaware State University, United States
  • Hofstra University, United States
  • Humboldt State University, United States
  • Kentucky State University, United States
  • Mansfield University, United States
  • Southern Illinois University, United States

Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Institutes:

  • Andalusia Centre for Marine Science and Technology, Spain
  • Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Philippine
  • Central Institute of Brackish Water Aquaculture, India
  • Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, India
  • Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, India
  • Deep Bay Marine Field Station, Canada
  • Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Australia
  • Fisheries Research Services Marine Laboratory, UK
  • Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics, Chile

Universities in USA for Fisheries & Aquaculture:

  • Auburn University, United States.
  • Brunswick Community College, United States
  • Delaware State University, United States
  • Hofstra University, United States
  • Humboldt State University, United States
  • Kentucky State University, United States

Global Fisheries and Aquaculture Research Institutes:

  • Andalusia Centre for Marine Science and Technology, Spain
  • Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, Philippine
  • Central Institute of Brackish Water Aquaculture, India
  • Central Institute of Fisheries Technology, India
  • Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute, India
  • Deep Bay Marine Field Station, Canada
  • Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Australia
  • Fisheries Research Services Marine Laboratory, UK
  • Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics, Chile

Aquaculture & Fisheries Research Institutes in USA:

  • NTNU Centre of Fisheries and Aquaculture (Sea Lab)
  • American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists (AIFRB)
  • Laboratory of Aquaculture & Artemia Reference Centre

Global Fisheries & Aquaculture Societies:

  • Asian Fisheries Society
  • China Society of Fisheries, China
  • Korean Society of Fisheries and Sciences (KOSFAS), Korea
  • Aquaculture Association of Canada, Canada
  • Aquaculture Association of S. Africa, South Africa
  • European Aquaculture Society, Europe
  • Brazilian Aquaculture Society (AQUABIO), Brazil
  • Indonesian Aquaculture Society, Indonesia
  • Society of Aquaculture Professionals, India
  • Malaysian Fisheries Society, Malaysia
  • Egyptian Aquaculture Society, Egypt
  • Spanish Aquaculture Association (SEA), Spain

Fisheries & Aquaculture Societies in USA:

  • American Fisheries Society
  • South-eastern Fisheries Association
  • U. S. Aquaculture Society
  • National Aquaculture Association

Funding Agencies:

  • Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations,
  • World Aquaculture Society
  • Taiwan Fish Society, Taiwan
  • Malaysian Fisheries Society , Malaysia

Conclusion: Fisheries & Aquaculture is one of the fastest growing food production sectors in the world. More importantly, it is a fundamental element in the global solution to provide a sustainable seafood source. The addition of aquaculture to help satisfy fish demand helps natural stock population and growth, lessening the strain on stressed fisheries.

Market value

Despite the long tradition of aquaculture in a few countries, it is still a young food production sector in the global sector and has started growing rapidly in the last 30 years or so. It now accounts for more than a third of the world’s total supply of food fish and undoubtedly the contribution of aquaculture to seafood supplied will increase in the future. Aquaculture has the potential to become the sustainable practice that can supplement capture fisheries and significantly contribute to feeding the world’s growing population. The exponential growth of global populace is fueling the need for cultured fisheries, particularly in affluent developed nations. The growth of aquaculture market is playing its role in bridging the gap between demand and supply of fishery industry products.

The market is, however, challenged by environmental concerns, leading to other economic and social concerns. Instead of helping to ease the crisis in wild fisheries, unsustainable aquaculture development could exacerbate the problems and create new ones, damaging our important and already-stressed coastal areas.

Markets and Markets proposes to use secondary as well as primary sources for researching the global markets for aquaculture market in different applications. Various secondary sources such as annual reports, magazines, and databases will be used to identify and collect information useful for this extensive technical and commercial assessment. The primary sources –experts from related industries and suppliers will be interviewed to obtain and verify required information to confirm the accuracy. The collected information will be presented in the form of detailed research report.

Market growth

In the previous year, actual production from catch fisheries rose only slightly by 0.7 per cent to reach 90.6 million tonnes. However, world aquaculture production rose by for per cent to 78 million tonnes. Trade is aquatic products was steady in 2015 at a live weight equivalent of 59.8 million tonnes with the value falling back by 9.6 per cent to $128.8 billion. According to France AgriMer, the rise in production last year was spurred on by a rising consumption, which increased by two per cent to 147,5 million tonnes or more than 20.1 kg per person per year, with aquaculture products accounting for more than half of consumption at 10.6 kg per person.

In 2008, world exports of fish and fishery products reached a record value of US$102.0 billion, which was nine per cent higher than in 2007 and nearly double the corresponding value in 1998 (FAO, 2010a). Trade in fish and fishery products was affected by the financial crisis that began in late 2007 and erupted into a full-blown economic crisis in late September 2008. Preliminary estimates indicate that fish trade declined by seven per cent in 2009 compared with 2008.

The top-ten exporters of fish and fishery products in 1998 and 2008 are shown in Table 4. China, Norway and Thailand are the top three exporters, with China alone contributing almost 10 per cent, or about US$10.1 billion. A growing share of China’s fishery exports consists of reprocessed raw material. China’s fishery imports have registered a significant increase, up from US$1 billion in 1998 to US$5.1 billion in 2008, when it was the sixth-largest importer. Viet Nam, the sixth-largest exporter of fish and fishery products in the world, has also experienced significant growth, up from US$0.8 billion in 1998 to US$4.6 billion in 2008. 

World aquaculture production is dominated by species at the lower end of the food chain. Carp and shellfish account for a significant share (more than 70 per cent by volume) of species cultivated in developing countries for human consumption. However, in response to a ready market for these species in both developed and developing countries, the production of species at the higher end of the food chain (in particular, carnivorous species) has, in recent years, been growing rapidly compared with that of species at the lower end of the food chain. The demand for fish as a healthy and nutritious food commodity is increasing, even in the developing world, particularly in China, India and Indonesia, i.e. countries with a large population and increasing disposable income.

Feeding an expected global population of 9 billion by 2050 is a daunting challenge that is engaging researchers, technical experts, and leaders the world over. A relatively unappreciated, yet promising, fact is that fish can play a major role in satisfying the palates of the world’s growing middle income group while also meeting the food security needs of the poorest. Already, fish represents 16 percent of all animal protein consumed globally, and this proportion of the world’s food basket is likely to increase as consumers with rising incomes seek higher value seafood and as aquaculture steps up to meet increasing demand. Aquaculture has grown at an impressive rate over the past decades. It has helped to produce more food fish, kept the overall price of fish down, and made fish and seafood more accessible to consumers around the world. That’s why greater investment is needed in the industry—for new and safer technologies, their adaptation to local conditions, and their adoption in appropriate settings. But supplying fish sustainably—producing it without depleting productive natural resources and without damaging the precious aquatic environment—is a huge challenge. We continue to see excessive and irresponsible harvesting in capture fisheries and in aquaculture. Disease outbreaks, among other things, have heavily impacted production—most recently with early mortality syndrome in shrimp in Asia and America. At the World Bank, we hear from the heads of major seafood companies that they want to secure access to reliable and environmentally sustainable supply chains. Matching growing market demand with this private sector interest in reliable and sustainable sourcing presents a major opportunity for developing countries prepared to invest in improved fisheries management and environmentally sustainable aquaculture.