Food Chemistry Market Analysis and Reports | Canada Conference Series

Market Analysis - Food Chemistry 2017

INTRODUCTION

 

The study of chemistry and nutrition probably dates from the first millennium AD and the route to modern Food chemistry can be traced through the alchemist philosophies of medieval China, India and Europe, although it took about a thousand years for chemistry to grow into a coherent and

Inclusive discipline. The marriage of chemistry and biology led to many progeny, including

agricultural chemistry, biological chemistry, food chemistry, industrial chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Food Chemistry is an overview of chemistry related to food sciences, such as food analysis, microbiology, nutrition, and food engineering etc. Food chemistry deals with food and Sustenance Now there are some emerging new trends in college education. For the foreseeable future, this seems to be the era of decreasing unit funding per student and smaller class sizes. There is increasing emphasis on improving learning and teaching (L&T) quality, measuring student based learning outcomes, and improving core competencies. Teaching loads for most faculties are increasing. All this points to a need for better efficiency. Perhaps through improved study skills, better teaching methods, and increased distance learning. After decades of teaching food chemistry it is noticeable that these trends bring with them constraints and challenges for the students, Researchers, Industrialists.

 

Whereas, good nutrition helps individuals achieve general health and well-being. In addition, dietary modifications might be prescribed for a variety of complaints including allergies, anemia, arthritis, colds, depressions, fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, high or low blood pressure, insomnia, headaches, obesity, pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), respiratory conditions, and stress.

 

The four basic food groups, as outlined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) are:

  • dairy products (such as milk and cheese)
  • meat and eggs (such as fish, poultry, pork, beef, and eggs)
  • grains (such as bread cereals, rice, and pasta)
  • fruits and vegetables

 

The USDA recommendation for adults is that consumption of meat, eggs, and dairy products should not exceed 20% oftotal daily caloric intake. The rest (80%) should be devoted to vegetables, fruits, 

and grains.For children age two orolder, 55% of their caloric intake should be in the form of carbohydrates, 30% from fat, and 15% from proteins. Inaddition, saturated fat intake should not exceed 

10% of total caloric intake. 

 

WHY CANADA?

Qualifications Valued Around the World

Canada’s high academic standards and rigorous quality controls mean that you’ll be earning a high-quality education that will open doors for your future and benefit your career over the long term. A Canadian degree, diploma or certificate is globally recognized as being equivalent to those obtained from the United States or Commonwealth countries.

 

Multicultural Society

With almost all of the world’s ethnic groups represented in Canada, it’s hard not to find ethnic foods and recreation activities associated with specific cultures. Student get in touch with number of ethnic clubs and associations related to Scientific Trades.

Since research is one of the key components of a Canadian post-secondary education, one have ample opportunity to become a part of this vibrant aspect of education. In Canada, government and industry together support research including: telecommunications, medicine, agriculture, computer technology, and environmental science.

 

Land of Possibilities

Under Canada’s highly dynamic and hands-on academic environment, Canada has become examples of excellence, innovation, and beauty, all of which—along with top-notch educational institutions—make Canada one of the leading study abroad destinations in the world. Canada is one of the study destinations which holds International reputation for educational standards. The country spends more on education (as a percentage of GDP) compared to the OECD average, and is the second highest among G-8 countries. Canada boasts a wide range of quality educational institutions for both degrees and diplomas in technical and professional disciplines. Over 1, 30,000 international students attend Canadian colleges and universities. Canada holds high international reputation for educational standard. The cost of living in Canada is lower than countries like Australia, England or the United States. Canada also offers post study work options to the eligible applicants.

 

Canadian Universities

Canadian universities are known for being consistently high quality and for offering internationally accepted degrees and credentials; some are ranked in the top 100 by reputable sources as The Times Higher Education Supplement and Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities.

 Over 10,000 undergraduate and graduate degree programs are offered at more than 100 institutions nationwide—and, tuition is generally much lower than in other leading study abroad countries. Students can pursue their studies at one of Canada’s top universities for roughly half of what it would cost to attend an equally reputable program at a private US university.

 International students can expect to be assisted in their university studies by such resources and services as orientation sessions, support programs, academic advising, prayer rooms, safe walk programs, student clubs, and assistance with medical concerns or housing issues.

 International students can often work while they study, taking advantage of many cooperative education and internship opportunities. There are also immigration programs that international students may qualify for post-graduation.

 The high quality of Canadian university education is further enabled by membership in the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) and provincial government charters.

 

Conference City

Vancouver's food and beverage cluster is of great importance to the region, and along with Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, is one of the largest food and beverage clusters on the continent.

The food processing sector has long been a major employment and economic driver of the Province of British Columbia and the City of Vancouver. The Food Innovation & Research Studio (FIRSt) at George Brown College guides its industry partners from concept to commercialization. Building on the College’s extensive culinary experience and success through its training, applied research and development activities, FIRSt blends food science and culinary arts to help industry innovate. FIRSt is a Technology Access Centre funded by the Government of Canada.

 

Creating a system for producing, processing, distributing, and consuming food that is environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable is a City priority.

In fact, one of the main goals of the Greenest City initiative is to become a global leader in urban food systems by 2020.

 

To achieve this goal, the City has started a number of major food initiatives.

 

Council is working to:

·         Establish partnerships with private businesses, non-profit groups, and volunteers

·         Develop innovative new policies and regulations to create a sustainable food system

·         Increase public awareness of the link between local food and a healthy environment

·         Invest in urban food projects through grants and funding

·         Increase city and neighbourhood food assets by 50%

 

Why to Attend this Conference?

Educational opportunities:  No matter how experienced you are at your business, everyone can learn.  Working in research projects or business venture one can often be isolating, and without exposure to a variety of points of view, we can miss new ideas and trends that can impact future results.  The educational aspect this conference can expose you to new ways of conducting your business and help you discover how to be more productive.

 

Networking with peers:  Food Chemistry 2017 conference will  provide a great opportunity to network.  Often competitors from other regions of the country can become valuable resources for referrals and best-practices.  Avoiding peers for fear of others discovering your competitive advantage can actually limit your own success.  Collaboration is the way to approach networking.  While there are those whose intentions can be suspect, most people can help each other uncover ideas and spark inspiration when they get to know each other on a personal level.

 

Expand your Business:  Food Chemistry 2017 is a place where you can learn more about the current business climate.  Discovering innovative products and services for your business is necessary to stay competitive in today’s fast-paced world.  Plus, these vendors who sell to your industry fully grasp what is happening inside your competition.  Invest time with the sponsors at the event and turn them into your friends and allies.

 

Position yourself as an expert.  When you are active in your research and industry, you can develop a reputation as an expert to your peers and your clients.  Those who are engaged over the long term are often asked to speak at the events and to write articles for their publications.  Like it or not, others like to associate with the experts in any field.  Clients feel good about doing business with those that are celebrated by their peers. If your strategy is to be the best-kept secret in your business community and research area, you will be missing a valuable opportunity.

 

Have fun.  Being in research or business should be rewarding and fun.  All work and no play can get old fast.  Food Chemistry 2017conference can add a layer of enjoyment to managing your career growth by mixing a social aspect into your learning and industry branding efforts. Here we are to share our beautiful city, a destination where you can unwind and enjoy yourself as Vancouver is surrounded by mountains, and also has thriving art, theatre and music scenes. Vancouver Art Gallery is known for its works by regional artists, while the Museum of Anthropology houses preeminent First Nations collections., moreover July in the city does not disappoint, with major events every weekend.  Taking an extra day at the beginning or end of the trip to explore or visit friends in the region is also a great way to maximize the investment in travel.  Never underestimate the power of a little fun mixed with some interesting people!

 

Benefits of this conference

·         Learn about the latest research in your field

·         Grow as a researcher and presenter

·         Obtain feedback on your research

·         Meet and get to know your peers

·         Gain visibility in your field

·         Share your research findings with others in your field

·         Regroup and rethink

·         Stay on top of trends and topics

·         Promote Creativity & Innovation in business field

 

Market Research

Canadian Dairy Research

There are a total of 23 research projects involving more than 100 scientists, from 15 institutions and 8 government research centres across the country. Some of the nation’s best dairy scientists  trains more than 65 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The overall objective of this kind of program is to promote the efficiency and sustainability of Canadian dairy farms, grow markets and supply high quality, safe and nutritious dairy products to Canadians.

 

Prospects for food and nutrition

 

Global progress in improving human nutrition will continue, but in numerical terms it will be slow. Even by 2030, hundreds of millions of poor people will remain under-nourished unless local food production is given higher priority and inequality of access to food is reduced. However, the lower incidence of undernourishment will make the problem more tractable through national and international policy interventions.

 

The world has made significant progress in raising nutrition levels over the past three decades. These levels are most commonly measured in terms of kilocalories per person per day.

World average food consumption per person has risen by almost a fifth, from 2 360 kcal per person per day in the mid-1960s to 2 800 kcal per person per day today. The gains in the world average reflect predominantly those of the developing countries, given that the industrial and transition economies had fairly high levels of food consumption already in the mid-1960s. Over the period to 1997-99, average daily per capita food consumption in developing countries rose from 2 050 kcal to 2 680 kcal.

The proportion of the world's population living in countries with low average food energy intakes has declined dramatically. In the mid-1960s, no less than 57 percent were living in countries with average intakes below 2 200 kcal per day. India and China both came into this category. By 1997-99, although world population had almost doubled to nearly six billion, this proportion had fallen to just 10 percent. Even the absolute numbers - which decline more slowly because of population growth - fell by over two-thirds, from 1 890 million to 570 million.

At the other extreme, the share of the world's population living in countries with average food energy intakes above 2 700 kcal per person per day has more than doubled, from 30 percent to 61 percent. Rapid gains in some of the largest developing countries, including China, Brazil, Indonesia and Nigeria, account for much of this progress. India, however, has yet to move into this category.

Over this same period, world annual consumption of cereals for both food and feed has doubled to 1.9 billion tonnes, while that of meat has more than doubled - no mean achievement considering popular fears that the world was running out of potential to increase production. The main forces driving this achievement have included higher in-comes, which have increased effective demand, increased supplies, owing to improvements in productivity, and the growth of trade and transport links, which have allowed food deficits in some areas to be covered by surpluses from other areas.

 

 

Share of Non-Alcoholic Beverage Market by Volume (CANADA)

The majority of tea and coffee processing takes place in Ontario (41 establishments), Quebec (34 establishments) and British Columbia (26 establishments), followed by Alberta (9 establishments), Nova Scotia (3 establishments), Manitoba (2 establishments), and New Brunswick (2 establishments). Statistics Canada's Business Patterns Database indicates that in 2008 production facilities ranged in size from small one- or two-person operations to large plants employing up to 500 people. Four of the six major coffee and tea manufacturers (sales over $100 million) are foreign-owned.

There is a strong multinational presence in the coffee industry with some firms offering both tea and coffee products. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) have contributed to the growth of both imports and exports as their Canadian plants have focussed on areas where they have competitive advantages on a regional basis in both the U.S. and Canadian markets or in production flexibility. Canadian plants produce commonly known brands for the Canadian or North American markets, while benefitting from the marketing strengths of their parent MNE firms. They often have product mandates for "mainstream" products, as well as for value-added short-run production of less popular lines. Such mandates can build exports. At the same time, the need to fill product offerings in the Canadian market can increase imports.

Similarly, many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have rationalized and focussed their operations to remain competitive. These strategies involve the development of specialty products for market niches, such as organic or fairly traded products. In some cases SMEs also co-pack brand name products for MNEs, produce private-label products, or make products for use by foodservice operations such as coffee-themed restaurants.

Employment in Food sectors in Canada

The food processing sector is one of the largest manufacturing sectors in Ontario and in Canada. Toronto is a major decision-making centre for the food industry in Canada, with half of Canada's top ranked food and beverage manufacturers being headquartered in the city.

The food and beverage cluster has long been a major component of Toronto CMA's economy. It is the second largest manufacturing sub-sector in the Toronto CMA. The 1,149 employment establishments located in the Toronto CMA employ more than 51,000 people. Employment in this sector has increased at a rate of 0.4% annually during 2003-2013.

Canada Food Processing Industry

Core food industry activities include food processing, warehousing and distribution, retailing and food services. These include packaging, design, the production of food industry equipment, biotechnology and specialized storage and transportation (i.e. refrigerated).

Bakeries are the largest single type of food processing plant, and this has resulted in diverse, high quality products in this sub-sector. Meat processing is the next largest sub-sector, followed by beverages.

 

Organisations funding food research and food industries:

 

Ministry of Food Processing Industries, INDIA-The Ministry of Food Processing Industries, the Nodal Ministry of the Government of India for the sector has a clear goal of attaining these objectives by facilitating and acting as a catalyst to attract quality investments from within India and abroad into this sector with the aim of making food processing a national initiative.

Budget Allocation: 487 crore

Ashoka Innovators for the Public (United States/International) – Ashoka supports a network of 3,000 social entrepreneurs across the world. By providing financing and start-up capital, Ashoka has been transforming the landscape of social innovation since 1980. It is encouraging fundamental transformation of the food chain to full nutrition with an initiative linking human wellbeing, agriculture, and the environment.

Australian International Food Security Centre (AIFSC) (Australia) – The AIFSC is a non-profit organization that works to promote agricultural innovation and attract investment to agricultural development projects. Aiming to build capacity for farming initiatives worldwide, AIFSC focuses on achieving specific goals like improving nutrition, connecting researchers with industry, and enhancing supply chain systems to allow farmers to bring their products to market.

Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition (BCFN) (Italy) The Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition works to promote science and research for combating hunger and malnutrition worldwide. Using knowledge gleaned from research projects around the world, BCFN seeks to take innovative ideas for tackling food insecurity and translate them into effective policy recommendations for governments around the world. Since their inception, they have released original research on a wide range of topics including global obesity and sustainable agriculture.

Bioversity International (International) – Bioversity International is a research and development organization aimed at supporting smallholder farmers in the developing world through sustainable agriculture and conservation. Bioversity International focuses on rain-fed farming systems, managed by smallholder farmers, in communities where large scale agriculture is not possible.

Calacea Farm, Not For Sale (NFS) (Romania) - NFS is an organization working to fight modern-day slavery around the world. In Romania, NFS works with their partner Mariana, operating an organic farm, which accommodates survivors of human trafficking. Just outside Timișoara, the farm offers individuals in recovery opportunities for health care, education, life skill training and new employment, to restore dignity and help re-build their future. Last year, NFS helped construct a building to house up to 50 additional farm workers, a workshop space to make jam, milk, and cheese, and two greenhouses to produce fruits and vegetables.

Center for Food Safety (United States) - The Center for Food Safety is a non-profit advocacy organization that promotes food systems that are safe, sustainable, and environmentally sound. Using a legal team, original research on agriculture, and grassroots organizing, CFS’ mission is to protect human health and the environment, achieved through careful monitoring of the agricultural industry for violations of food safety and environmental laws.

The Center for Studies and Development of Cambodian Agriculture (CEDAC) (Cambodia) - In partnership with Farmer and Nature Net (FNN), CEDAC has worked to promote the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), which has been shown to increase yields and improve soil fertility while reducing the use of chemicals and maintaining local ownership of seeds. CEDAC supports several other agricultural innovations and techniques including Ecological Chicken Raising (ECR), pig raising, home gardening, aquaculture, composting, and multi-purpose farming.

Chicago Council on Global Affairs Global Agricultural Development Initiative (United States/International) - The Global Agricultural Development Initiative seeks to inform the development of U.S. policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the U.S. Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

Christensen Fund (United States) – The Christensen Fund is a philanthropic organization dedicated to promoting biological and cultural diversity, making grants to organizations that work in fields like conservation science, visual arts, and education. The Fund is particularly noted for its work on agrobiodiversity and food sovereignty, in which it provides resources for indigenous and local farming communities to protect and enhance local food systems.

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) (International) - The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research is a network of research organizations that are looking to promote and support global food security. With 15 centers around the globe, CGIAR helps to share knowledge and advance research on rural poverty, health and nutrition, and management of natural resources.

EARTH University (Costa Rica) – EARTH University is an international non-profit undergraduate institution based in Costa Rica focused on agricultural sciences and natural resource management. EARTH’s mission is to “prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.”

Ecoagriculture Partners (United States/International) – Ecoagriculture Partners supports agricultural communities in managing their landscapes by using ecoagriculture in order to enhance rural livelihoods, conserve biodiversity, and produce food and fiber in environmentally sustainable ways.

ECOVA MALI (Mali) – Founded by former Peace Corps volunteers, Cynthia Hellmann and Gregory Flatt, ECOVA MALI works with Malian farmers to teach other farmers about  sustainable agriculture methods. They also offer micro-financing and small-scale grants so that farmers can invest in the sustainability, both social and environmental, of their operations.

Farm Labor Organizing Committee (United States) – Founded in 1967, FLOC was initially organized by Baldemar Velasquez, a migrant worker who sought to improve the working conditions of others like him by creating a mobile organizing base that could move along with workers as the seasons changed. Now, FLOC has over 20,000 members and works in both the United States and Mexico.

Feeding the 5000 (United Kingdom/International) – Tristram Stuart’s initiative is organizing the world to prevent "wonky" fruits, vegetables, and other food from being wasted. Feeding the 5000 encourages farmers to participate in the “gleaning movement” – where volunteers collect unattractive produce that would otherwise be wasted for consumption.

Food & Water Watch (United States) - Founded on the belief that people have a fundamental right to trust the safety of the products they eat and drink, Food and Water Watch is a nonprofit organization that works to make food and water resources accessible and sustainable. They work to monitor food production and clean water systems, track the environmental quality of oceans, keep watch over U.S. corporate influence on public policy, and hold policymakers accountable for policies that pollute.

Food First: The Institute for Food and Development Policy (United States/International) - Food First is a research and advocacy organization that seeks to eliminate the injustices that cause hunger worldwide, working with social movements to amplify their voices and boost their efforts toward food justice and sovereignty. Believing that change happens from the ground up, Food First supports an agricultural approach that moves away from transnational agri-food industry to one focused primarily on farmers and communities.

Food Mythbusters (United States) – Food Mythbusters is a campaign of the Real Food Media Project that seeks to dispel misconceptions about food production and promote reforms in industrial agriculture, unfair labor practices, and food advertising, among other issues. In order to tell “the real story of our food,” Food Mythbusters utilizes video series, grassroots events, and interactive digital content.

Global Partnerships for Afghanistan (GPFA) (Afghanistan) – GFPA launched the Women Working Together collaborative initiative in 2005 in order to increase the quality of life of women in Afghanistan. GPFA focuses on programming that enhances female-run farms and orchards, teaching food preservation, greenhouse operation, and other practices.

Good Planet Foundation (France) – The GoodPlanet Foundation seeks to educate the public about the importance of environmental protection. The organization utilizes the power of photographs, posters, websites, films, and other visual media to spread information. For example, GoodPlanet has lead successful campaigns on the awareness of ocean and forest conservation, respectively.

Growing Power (United States) – Growing Power, Inc. is an American non-profit organization and land trust that seeks “to grow food, minds, and community” through a network of farms, training sites, and community food systems that provide access to food for all people. Growing Power also runs a number of youth programs and collaborates with various organizations, including Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign. This year, Growing Power celebrates its 20th anniversary.

Heifer International (United States/International) - Heifer International is a non-profit organization that seeks to end hunger and poverty by providing communities in need with livestock and other animals that help them to build local, self-sufficient agricultural systems. It also offers a variety of resources that help impoverished farmers create sustainable sources of income, providing them with research on effective grazing methods, optimal animal well-being, and the creation of local networks that farmers can use to share resources with one another.

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) (United States/International) – IATP is a research and advocacy organization working to promote fair and sustainable food, farm, and trade systems around the world. Created in response to the American family farm crisis, IATP initially sought to document the failed policies that had led to prices dropping below the cost of production, and put many family farmers out of business. Now, IATP works with organizations worldwide to analyze the impact of global trade agreements, develop clean energy models, and stop the excessive use of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture.

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) (International) – This United Nations-supported financial institution is on a mission to eradicate rural poverty in developing countries. IFAD helps empower the rural poor by providing them with the resources they need to invest in themselves and increase their incomes.

L.I.F.E. (Lasting Impact for Ethiopia) (Ethiopia) – This nonprofit organization is educating and empowering Ethiopian youth. In January 2012, a school for Ethiopian youth was established in the village of Nazerate, with a curriculum emphasizing literacy, agriculture, health, and sustainability.

Latin American and Caribbean Center for Rural Women (Enlac) (Latin American and Caribbean Regions) – The Latin American and Caribbean Center for Rural Women (Enlac in Spanish) serves as an organizing voice for marginalized, rural women. Enlac calls for policies that give Latin American and Caribbean women equal access to land rights, raise awareness about violence against female agriculture workers, boost access to clean water, and conserve native seeds.

Millennium Institute (MI) (United States/International) – Millennium Institute is an independent nonprofit with the goal of promoting systems literacy and dynamic modeling tools in order to achieve sustainable development globally. MI works to achieve awareness through public education and strategic partnerships centered around interdependence and sustainability. 

One Acre Fund (United States/Sub-Saharan Africa) – The One Acre Fund provides farmers in sub-Saharan Africa with the tools they need to successfully operate their plots, such as seeds and fertilizers, credit, access to markets, and educational programs on farming techniques. These services are provided at a fee to the farmers who participate.

ONE Campaign (International) – The ONE Campaign is an international advocacy group aimed at alleviating extreme poverty and preventable disease through public awareness.

Oxfam International (International) – Through a wide variety of approaches – ranging from long-term campaigns, such as their Behind the Brands Campaign to secure labor rights for employees in the cocoa industry, to immediate emergency support – Oxfam has taken measures to bring an end to global poverty.

Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC-United) (United States) –ROC-United is a labor advocacy organization that focuses specifically on the American restaurant workforce. Founded by restaurant workers who survived the 9/11 attacks to help other displaced workers, ROC-United primarily advocates for better wages and working conditions, seeking to act as a champion for members of an industry that is less than one percent unionized.

The Savory Institute (United States/International) – This organization, lead by Allan Savory, the “father of holistic management,” uses livestock in sustainable ways to restore grasslands. The Savory Institute teams up with private investors to purchase ranch real estate for restoration.

 Slow Food International (Italy/International) - Slow Food International is an international non-profit organization with supporters in 150 countries that emphasizes the importance of good food and the factors that make it possible, including biodiversity, culture, and knowledge. Created to respond to an increasingly “fast food” world, Slow Food seeks to preserve local traditions, enhance people’s understanding of food and where it comes from, and comprehend the impact that our food choices make on the world.

Soil Association (United Kingdom) – The Soil Association is a U.K.-based charity that campaigns for humane and healthful food through sustainable farming and land use. Founded in 1946, Soil Association was an early player in the movement to identify links between farming practices and the health of humans, plants, animals, and ecosystems. Now, the organization works closely with communities to create and inspire trust in organic farming methods and the food that they produce.

Songtaab-Yalgré Association (SYA) (Burkina Faso) - SYA brings together women from across Burkina Faso to produce shea nuts, using the collective to simultaneously improve their literacy and their working conditions. As a locally-sourced crop, shea nuts were chosen for their potential to allow the women harvesting them to achieve a higher level of economic self-sufficiency, and empower them to become independent in their society. Workers at SYA distribute profits equally and set aside a percentage to fund community development projects as well.

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture (United States) – The Stone Barns Center is a non-profit organization that aims to create a food system that is healthy, sustainable, and which benefits all people. On an 80-acre farm just outside of New York City, the Center offers cooking classes for all ages, organizes a seasonal market, and operates two food venues. All profits support farm operations and community education programs, and the Center encourages anyone to visit and see the benefits of a sustainable farm.

United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (International) – The Food and Agriculture Organization is the United Nations’ international agency overseeing global food security and agriculture. Among their many research areas, FAO’s main activities include knowledge-sharing among member nations, making information about food and agriculture available for all people, supporting policies to reduce malnutrition and other illnesses worldwide, rallying the international community to promote effective strategies for agricultural development, and conducting research to better understand the complex issues that face the global food system.

 WinRock (United States/International) – WinRock works with marginalized people all over the world to provide them with the skills and resources they need to bring themselves out of poverty. WinRock’s projects include, among others, empowering women and youth, and teaching environmentally responsible farming methods.

World Food Programme (WFP) (International) – The World Food Programme is an international anti-hunger organization within the United Nations that collects and distributes food assistance to populations in need. As the world’s largest organization working to combat hunger, WFP distributes food to over 90 million people annually, mainly delivering assistance to children, refugees, people in emergency situations (such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti) and the rural poor.

World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) (Taiwan/International) – AVRDC is an international non-profit organization dedicated to reducing poverty and malnutrition in the developing world by increasing agricultural production and access to a variety of vegetables, providing essential micronutrients for populations in need. The Center works with both private and public sector partners to strike an effective balance between necessary research for new technologies and development to employ those technologies effectively.

 

Universities offering Food science study in Canada

Alberta University

British Columbia University

Greater Vancouver University

Manitoba University

Newfoundland University

Nova Scotia University

Ontario University

Quebec University

Saskatchewan University

Graduate University

Canada University

Alberta University

British Columbia University

Greater Vancouver University

Newfoundland University

Nova Scotia University

Ontario University

Quebec University

Canadian Food sector leaders

Maple Leaf Foods Inc.

Campbell Soup Company Limited

Cargill Limited

Fiera Foods Company

George Weston Limited

Kraft Canada Inc.

Unilever Canada Limited

Wrigley Canada

Olymel

Red Deer

Cornwall

Lakeside Packers

Lilydale Foods

 Olymel

Sunrise Poultry

McCain Foods Limited   

George Weston Limited  

Saputo Inc.

La Coop fédérée             

Molson Canada

Nestlé Canada Inc

Cott Corporation

Parmalat Dairy & Bakery Inc.      

Agropur Cooperative Agro-Alimentaire

Pepsi-QTG Canada         

General Mills Canada Corporation           

FPI Limited         

Export Packers Company Limited             

Campbell Company of Canada  

Lilydale Co-operative Limited    

Maple Lodge Farms Ltd.               

Vincor International Inc.              

SunOpta Inc.     

Breton Foods Canada Inc.           

Barry Callebaut Canada Inc.        

Clearwater Seafoods Limited Partnership            

Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd.             

Van Houtte Inc.               

Carriere Foods Inc.          

INTRODUCTION

 

The study of chemistry and nutrition probably dates from the first millennium AD and the route to modern Food chemistry can be traced through the alchemist philosophies of medieval China, India and Europe, although it took about a thousand years for chemistry to grow into a coherent and

Inclusive discipline. The marriage of chemistry and biology led to many progeny, including

agricultural chemistry, biological chemistry, food chemistry, industrial chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry.

Food Chemistry is an overview of chemistry related to food sciences, such as food analysis, microbiology, nutrition, and food engineering etc. Food chemistry deals with food and Sustenance Now there are some emerging new trends in college education. For the foreseeable future, this seems to be the era of decreasing unit funding per student and smaller class sizes. There is increasing emphasis on improving learning and teaching (L&T) quality, measuring student based learning outcomes, and improving core competencies. Teaching loads for most faculties are increasing. All this points to a need for better efficiency. Perhaps through improved study skills, better teaching methods, and increased distance learning. After decades of teaching food chemistry it is noticeable that these trends bring with them constraints and challenges for the students, Researchers, Industrialists.

 

Whereas, good nutrition helps individuals achieve general health and well-being. In addition, dietary modifications might be prescribed for a variety of complaints including allergies, anemia, arthritis, colds, depressions, fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, high or low blood pressure, insomnia, headaches, obesity, pregnancy, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), respiratory conditions, and stress.

 

The four basic food groups, as outlined by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) are:

  • dairy products (such as milk and cheese)
  • meat and eggs (such as fish, poultry, pork, beef, and eggs)
  • grains (such as bread cereals, rice, and pasta)
  • fruits and vegetables

 

The USDA recommendation for adults is that consumption of meat, eggs, and dairy products should not exceed 20% oftotal daily caloric intake. The rest (80%) should be devoted to vegetables, fruits, and grains. For children age two orolder, 55% of their caloric intake should be in the form of carbohydrates, 30% from fat, and 15% from proteins. Inaddition, saturated fat intake should not exceed 10% of total caloric intake. 

 

WHY CANADA?

Qualifications Valued Around the World

Canada’s high academic standards and rigorous quality controls mean that you’ll be earning a high-quality education that will open doors for your future and benefit your career over the long term. A Canadian degree, diploma or certificate is globally recognized as being equivalent to those obtained from the United States or Commonwealth countries.

 

Multicultural Society

With almost all of the world’s ethnic groups represented in Canada, it’s hard not to find ethnic foods and recreation activities associated with specific cultures. Student get in touch with number of ethnic clubs and associations related to Scientific Trades.

Since research is one of the key components of a Canadian post-secondary education, one have ample opportunity to become a part of this vibrant aspect of education. In Canada, government and industry together support research including: telecommunications, medicine, agriculture, computer technology, and environmental science.

 

Land of Possibilities

Under Canada’s highly dynamic and hands-on academic environment, Canada has become examples of excellence, innovation, and beauty, all of which—along with top-notch educational institutions—make Canada one of the leading study abroad destinations in the world. Canada is one of the study destinations which holds International reputation for educational standards. The country spends more on education (as a percentage of GDP) compared to the OECD average, and is the second highest among G-8 countries. Canada boasts a wide range of quality educational institutions for both degrees and diplomas in technical and professional disciplines. Over 1, 30,000 international students attend Canadian colleges and universities. Canada holds high international reputation for educational standard. The cost of living in Canada is lower than countries like Australia, England or the United States. Canada also offers post study work options to the eligible applicants.

 

Canadian Universities

Canadian universities are known for being consistently high quality and for offering internationally accepted degrees and credentials; some are ranked in the top 100 by reputable sources as The Times Higher Education Supplement and Shanghai Jiao Tong University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities.

 Over 10,000 undergraduate and graduate degree programs are offered at more than 100 institutions nationwide—and, tuition is generally much lower than in other leading study abroad countries. Students can pursue their studies at one of Canada’s top universities for roughly half of what it would cost to attend an equally reputable program at a private US university.

 International students can expect to be assisted in their university studies by such resources and services as orientation sessions, support programs, academic advising, prayer rooms, safe walk programs, student clubs, and assistance with medical concerns or housing issues.

 International students can often work while they study, taking advantage of many cooperative education and internship opportunities. There are also immigration programs that international students may qualify for post-graduation.

 The high quality of Canadian university education is further enabled by membership in the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) and provincial government charters.

 

Conference City

Vancouver's food and beverage cluster is of great importance to the region, and along with Chicago, New York and Los Angeles, is one of the largest food and beverage clusters on the continent.

The food processing sector has long been a major employment and economic driver of the Province of British Columbia and the City of Vancouver. The Food Innovation & Research Studio (FIRSt) at George Brown College guides its industry partners from concept to commercialization. Building on the College’s extensive culinary experience and success through its training, applied research and development activities, FIRSt blends food science and culinary arts to help industry innovate. FIRSt is a Technology Access Centre funded by the Government of Canada.

 

Creating a system for producing, processing, distributing, and consuming food that is environmentally, socially, and economically sustainable is a City priority.

In fact, one of the main goals of the Greenest City initiative is to become a global leader in urban food systems by 2020.

 

To achieve this goal, the City has started a number of major food initiatives.

 

Council is working to:

·         Establish partnerships with private businesses, non-profit groups, and volunteers

·         Develop innovative new policies and regulations to create a sustainable food system

·         Increase public awareness of the link between local food and a healthy environment

·         Invest in urban food projects through grants and funding

·         Increase city and neighbourhood food assets by 50%

 

Why to Attend this Conference?

Educational opportunities:  No matter how experienced you are at your business, everyone can learn.  Working in research projects or business venture one can often be isolating, and without exposure to a variety of points of view, we can miss new ideas and trends that can impact future results.  The educational aspect this conference can expose you to new ways of conducting your business and help you discover how to be more productive.

 

Networking with peers:  Food Chemistry 2017 conference will  provide a great opportunity to network.  Often competitors from other regions of the country can become valuable resources for referrals and best-practices.  Avoiding peers for fear of others discovering your competitive advantage can actually limit your own success.  Collaboration is the way to approach networking.  While there are those whose intentions can be suspect, most people can help each other uncover ideas and spark inspiration when they get to know each other on a personal level.

 

Expand your Business:  Food Chemistry 2017 is a place where you can learn more about the current business climate.  Discovering innovative products and services for your business is necessary to stay competitive in today’s fast-paced world.  Plus, these vendors who sell to your industry fully grasp what is happening inside your competition.  Invest time with the sponsors at the event and turn them into your friends and allies.

 

Position yourself as an expert.  When you are active in your research and industry, you can develop a reputation as an expert to your peers and your clients.  Those who are engaged over the long term are often asked to speak at the events and to write articles for their publications.  Like it or not, others like to associate with the experts in any field.  Clients feel good about doing business with those that are celebrated by their peers. If your strategy is to be the best-kept secret in your business community and research area, you will be missing a valuable opportunity.

 

Have fun.  Being in research or business should be rewarding and fun.  All work and no play can get old fast.  Food Chemistry 2017conference can add a layer of enjoyment to managing your career growth by mixing a social aspect into your learning and industry branding efforts. Here we are to share our beautiful city, a destination where you can unwind and enjoy yourself as Vancouver is surrounded by mountains, and also has thriving art, theatre and music scenes. Vancouver Art Gallery is known for its works by regional artists, while the Museum of Anthropology houses preeminent First Nations collections., moreover July in the city does not disappoint, with major events every weekend.  Taking an extra day at the beginning or end of the trip to explore or visit friends in the region is also a great way to maximize the investment in travel.  Never underestimate the power of a little fun mixed with some interesting people!

 

Benefits of this conference

·         Learn about the latest research in your field

·         Grow as a researcher and presenter

·         Obtain feedback on your research

·         Meet and get to know your peers

·         Gain visibility in your field

·         Share your research findings with others in your field

·         Regroup and rethink

·         Stay on top of trends and topics

·         Promote Creativity & Innovation in business field

 

Market Research

Canadian Dairy Research

There are a total of 23 research projects involving more than 100 scientists, from 15 institutions and 8 government research centres across the country. Some of the nation’s best dairy scientists  trains more than 65 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. The overall objective of this kind of program is to promote the efficiency and sustainability of Canadian dairy farms, grow markets and supply high quality, safe and nutritious dairy products to Canadians.

 

Prospects for food and nutrition

 

Global progress in improving human nutrition will continue, but in numerical terms it will be slow. Even by 2030, hundreds of millions of poor people will remain under-nourished unless local food production is given higher priority and inequality of access to food is reduced. However, the lower incidence of undernourishment will make the problem more tractable through national and international policy interventions.

 

The world has made significant progress in raising nutrition levels over the past three decades. These levels are most commonly measured in terms of kilocalories per person per day.

World average food consumption per person has risen by almost a fifth, from 2 360 kcal per person per day in the mid-1960s to 2 800 kcal per person per day today. The gains in the world average reflect predominantly those of the developing countries, given that the industrial and transition economies had fairly high levels of food consumption already in the mid-1960s. Over the period to 1997-99, average daily per capita food consumption in developing countries rose from 2 050 kcal to 2 680 kcal.

The proportion of the world's population living in countries with low average food energy intakes has declined dramatically. In the mid-1960s, no less than 57 percent were living in countries with average intakes below 2 200 kcal per day. India and China both came into this category. By 1997-99, although world population had almost doubled to nearly six billion, this proportion had fallen to just 10 percent. Even the absolute numbers - which decline more slowly because of population growth - fell by over two-thirds, from 1 890 million to 570 million.

At the other extreme, the share of the world's population living in countries with average food energy intakes above 2 700 kcal per person per day has more than doubled, from 30 percent to 61 percent. Rapid gains in some of the largest developing countries, including China, Brazil, Indonesia and Nigeria, account for much of this progress. India, however, has yet to move into this category.

Over this same period, world annual consumption of cereals for both food and feed has doubled to 1.9 billion tonnes, while that of meat has more than doubled - no mean achievement considering popular fears that the world was running out of potential to increase production. The main forces driving this achievement have included higher in-comes, which have increased effective demand, increased supplies, owing to improvements in productivity, and the growth of trade and transport links, which have allowed food deficits in some areas to be covered by surpluses from other areas.

 

 

Share of Non-Alcoholic Beverage Market by Volume (CANADA)

The majority of tea and coffee processing takes place in Ontario (41 establishments), Quebec (34 establishments) and British Columbia (26 establishments), followed by Alberta (9 establishments), Nova Scotia (3 establishments), Manitoba (2 establishments), and New Brunswick (2 establishments). Statistics Canada's Business Patterns Database indicates that in 2008 production facilities ranged in size from small one- or two-person operations to large plants employing up to 500 people. Four of the six major coffee and tea manufacturers (sales over $100 million) are foreign-owned.

There is a strong multinational presence in the coffee industry with some firms offering both tea and coffee products. Multinational enterprises (MNEs) have contributed to the growth of both imports and exports as their Canadian plants have focussed on areas where they have competitive advantages on a regional basis in both the U.S. and Canadian markets or in production flexibility. Canadian plants produce commonly known brands for the Canadian or North American markets, while benefitting from the marketing strengths of their parent MNE firms. They often have product mandates for "mainstream" products, as well as for value-added short-run production of less popular lines. Such mandates can build exports. At the same time, the need to fill product offerings in the Canadian market can increase imports.

Similarly, many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have rationalized and focussed their operations to remain competitive. These strategies involve the development of specialty products for market niches, such as organic or fairly traded products. In some cases SMEs also co-pack brand name products for MNEs, produce private-label products, or make products for use by foodservice operations such as coffee-themed restaurants.

Employment in Food sectors in Canada

The food processing sector is one of the largest manufacturing sectors in Ontario and in Canada. Toronto is a major decision-making centre for the food industry in Canada, with half of Canada's top ranked food and beverage manufacturers being headquartered in the city.

The food and beverage cluster has long been a major component of Toronto CMA's economy. It is the second largest manufacturing sub-sector in the Toronto CMA. The 1,149 employment establishments located in the Toronto CMA employ more than 51,000 people. Employment in this sector has increased at a rate of 0.4% annually during 2003-2013.

Canada Food Processing Industry

Core food industry activities include food processing, warehousing and distribution, retailing and food services. These include packaging, design, the production of food industry equipment, biotechnology and specialized storage and transportation (i.e. refrigerated).

Bakeries are the largest single type of food processing plant, and this has resulted in diverse, high quality products in this sub-sector. Meat processing is the next largest sub-sector, followed by beverages.

 

Organisations funding food research and food industries:

 

Ministry of Food Processing Industries, INDIA-The Ministry of Food Processing Industries, the Nodal Ministry of the Government of India for the sector has a clear goal of attaining these objectives by facilitating and acting as a catalyst to attract quality investments from within India and abroad into this sector with the aim of making food processing a national initiative.

Budget Allocation: 487 crore

Ashoka Innovators for the Public (United States/International) – Ashoka supports a network of 3,000 social entrepreneurs across the world. By providing financing and start-up capital, Ashoka has been transforming the landscape of social innovation since 1980. It is encouraging fundamental transformation of the food chain to full nutrition with an initiative linking human wellbeing, agriculture, and the environment.

Australian International Food Security Centre (AIFSC) (Australia) – The AIFSC is a non-profit organization that works to promote agricultural innovation and attract investment to agricultural development projects. Aiming to build capacity for farming initiatives worldwide, AIFSC focuses on achieving specific goals like improving nutrition, connecting researchers with industry, and enhancing supply chain systems to allow farmers to bring their products to market.

Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition (BCFN) (Italy) The Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition works to promote science and research for combating hunger and malnutrition worldwide. Using knowledge gleaned from research projects around the world, BCFN seeks to take innovative ideas for tackling food insecurity and translate them into effective policy recommendations for governments around the world. Since their inception, they have released original research on a wide range of topics including global obesity and sustainable agriculture.

Bioversity International (International) – Bioversity International is a research and development organization aimed at supporting smallholder farmers in the developing world through sustainable agriculture and conservation. Bioversity International focuses on rain-fed farming systems, managed by smallholder farmers, in communities where large scale agriculture is not possible.

Calacea Farm, Not For Sale (NFS) (Romania) - NFS is an organization working to fight modern-day slavery around the world. In Romania, NFS works with their partner Mariana, operating an organic farm, which accommodates survivors of human trafficking. Just outside Timișoara, the farm offers individuals in recovery opportunities for health care, education, life skill training and new employment, to restore dignity and help re-build their future. Last year, NFS helped construct a building to house up to 50 additional farm workers, a workshop space to make jam, milk, and cheese, and two greenhouses to produce fruits and vegetables.

Center for Food Safety (United States) - The Center for Food Safety is a non-profit advocacy organization that promotes food systems that are safe, sustainable, and environmentally sound. Using a legal team, original research on agriculture, and grassroots organizing, CFS’ mission is to protect human health and the environment, achieved through careful monitoring of the agricultural industry for violations of food safety and environmental laws.

The Center for Studies and Development of Cambodian Agriculture (CEDAC) (Cambodia) - In partnership with Farmer and Nature Net (FNN), CEDAC has worked to promote the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), which has been shown to increase yields and improve soil fertility while reducing the use of chemicals and maintaining local ownership of seeds. CEDAC supports several other agricultural innovations and techniques including Ecological Chicken Raising (ECR), pig raising, home gardening, aquaculture, composting, and multi-purpose farming.

Chicago Council on Global Affairs Global Agricultural Development Initiative (United States/International) - The Global Agricultural Development Initiative seeks to inform the development of U.S. policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the U.S. Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

Christensen Fund (United States) – The Christensen Fund is a philanthropic organization dedicated to promoting biological and cultural diversity, making grants to organizations that work in fields like conservation science, visual arts, and education. The Fund is particularly noted for its work on agrobiodiversity and food sovereignty, in which it provides resources for indigenous and local farming communities to protect and enhance local food systems.

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR) (International) - The Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research is a network of research organizations that are looking to promote and support global food security. With 15 centers around the globe, CGIAR helps to share knowledge and advance research on rural poverty, health and nutrition, and management of natural resources.

EARTH University (Costa Rica) – EARTH University is an international non-profit undergraduate institution based in Costa Rica focused on agricultural sciences and natural resource management. EARTH’s mission is to “prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.”

Ecoagriculture Partners (United States/International) – Ecoagriculture Partners supports agricultural communities in managing their landscapes by using ecoagriculture in order to enhance rural livelihoods, conserve biodiversity, and produce food and fiber in environmentally sustainable ways.

ECOVA MALI (Mali) – Founded by former Peace Corps volunteers, Cynthia Hellmann and Gregory Flatt, ECOVA MALI works with Malian farmers to teach other farmers about  sustainable agriculture methods. They also offer micro-financing and small-scale grants so that farmers can invest in the sustainability, both social and environmental, of their operations.

Farm Labor Organizing Committee (United States) – Founded in 1967, FLOC was initially organized by Baldemar Velasquez, a migrant worker who sought to improve the working conditions of others like him by creating a mobile organizing base that could move along with workers as the seasons changed. Now, FLOC has over 20,000 members and works in both the United States and Mexico.

Feeding the 5000 (United Kingdom/International) – Tristram Stuart’s initiative is organizing the world to prevent "wonky" fruits, vegetables, and other food from being wasted. Feeding the 5000 encourages farmers to participate in the “gleaning movement” – where volunteers collect unattractive produce that would otherwise be wasted for consumption.

Food & Water Watch (United States) - Founded on the belief that people have a fundamental right to trust the safety of the products they eat and drink, Food and Water Watch is a nonprofit organization that works to make food and water resources accessible and sustainable. They work to monitor food production and clean water systems, track the environmental quality of oceans, keep watch over U.S. corporate influence on public policy, and hold policymakers accountable for policies that pollute.

Food First: The Institute for Food and Development Policy (United States/International) - Food First is a research and advocacy organization that seeks to eliminate the injustices that cause hunger worldwide, working with social movements to amplify their voices and boost their efforts toward food justice and sovereignty. Believing that change happens from the ground up, Food First supports an agricultural approach that moves away from transnational agri-food industry to one focused primarily on farmers and communities.

Food Mythbusters (United States) – Food Mythbusters is a campaign of the Real Food Media Project that seeks to dispel misconceptions about food production and promote reforms in industrial agriculture, unfair labor practices, and food advertising, among other issues. In order to tell “the real story of our food,” Food Mythbusters utilizes video series, grassroots events, and interactive digital content.

Global Partnerships for Afghanistan (GPFA) (Afghanistan) – GFPA launched the Women Working Together collaborative initiative in 2005 in order to increase the quality of life of women in Afghanistan. GPFA focuses on programming that enhances female-run farms and orchards, teaching food preservation, greenhouse operation, and other practices.

Good Planet Foundation (France) – The GoodPlanet Foundation seeks to educate the public about the importance of environmental protection. The organization utilizes the power of photographs, posters, websites, films, and other visual media to spread information. For example, GoodPlanet has lead successful campaigns on the awareness of ocean and forest conservation, respectively.

Growing Power (United States) – Growing Power, Inc. is an American non-profit organization and land trust that seeks “to grow food, minds, and community” through a network of farms, training sites, and community food systems that provide access to food for all people. Growing Power also runs a number of youth programs and collaborates with various organizations, including Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign. This year, Growing Power celebrates its 20th anniversary.

Heifer International (United States/International) - Heifer International is a non-profit organization that seeks to end hunger and poverty by providing communities in need with livestock and other animals that help them to build local, self-sufficient agricultural systems. It also offers a variety of resources that help impoverished farmers create sustainable sources of income, providing them with research on effective grazing methods, optimal animal well-being, and the creation of local networks that farmers can use to share resources with one another.

Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP) (United States/International) – IATP is a research and advocacy organization working to promote fair and sustainable food, farm, and trade systems around the world. Created in response to the American family farm crisis, IATP initially sought to document the failed policies that had led to prices dropping below the cost of production, and put many family farmers out of business. Now, IATP works with organizations worldwide to analyze the impact of global trade agreements, develop clean energy models, and stop the excessive use of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture.

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) (International) – This United Nations-supported financial institution is on a mission to eradicate rural poverty in developing countries. IFAD helps empower the rural poor by providing them with the resources they need to invest in themselves and increase their incomes.

L.I.F.E. (Lasting Impact for Ethiopia) (Ethiopia) – This nonprofit organization is educating and empowering Ethiopian youth. In January 2012, a school for Ethiopian youth was established in the village of Nazerate, with a curriculum emphasizing literacy, agriculture, health, and sustainability.

Latin American and Caribbean Center for Rural Women (Enlac) (Latin American and Caribbean Regions) – The Latin American and Caribbean Center for Rural Women (Enlac in Spanish) serves as an organizing voice for marginalized, rural women. Enlac calls for policies that give Latin American and Caribbean women equal access to land rights, raise awareness about violence against female agriculture workers, boost access to clean water, and conserve native seeds.

Millennium Institute (MI) (United States/International) – Millennium Institute is an independent nonprofit with the goal of promoting systems literacy and dynamic modeling tools in order to achieve sustainable development globally. MI works to achieve awareness through public education and strategic partnerships centered around interdependence and sustainability. 

One Acre Fund (United States/Sub-Saharan Africa) – The One Acre Fund provides farmers in sub-Saharan Africa with the tools they need to successfully operate their plots, such as seeds and fertilizers, credit, access to markets, and educational programs on farming techniques. These services are provided at a fee to the farmers who participate.

ONE Campaign (International) – The ONE Campaign is an international advocacy group aimed at alleviating extreme poverty and preventable disease through public awareness.

Oxfam International (International) – Through a wide variety of approaches – ranging from long-term campaigns, such as their Behind the Brands Campaign to secure labor rights for employees in the cocoa industry, to immediate emergency support – Oxfam has taken measures to bring an end to global poverty.

Restaurant Opportunities Centers United (ROC-United) (United States) –ROC-United is a labor advocacy organization that focuses specifically on the American restaurant workforce. Founded by restaurant workers who survived the 9/11 attacks to help other displaced workers, ROC-United primarily advocates for better wages and working conditions, seeking to act as a champion for members of an industry that is less than one percent unionized.

The Savory Institute (United States/International) – This organization, lead by Allan Savory, the “father of holistic management,” uses livestock in sustainable ways to restore grasslands. The Savory Institute teams up with private investors to purchase ranch real estate for restoration.

 Slow Food International (Italy/International) - Slow Food International is an international non-profit organization with supporters in 150 countries that emphasizes the importance of good food and the factors that make it possible, including biodiversity, culture, and knowledge. Created to respond to an increasingly “fast food” world, Slow Food seeks to preserve local traditions, enhance people’s understanding of food and where it comes from, and comprehend the impact that our food choices make on the world.

Soil Association (United Kingdom) – The Soil Association is a U.K.-based charity that campaigns for humane and healthful food through sustainable farming and land use. Founded in 1946, Soil Association was an early player in the movement to identify links between farming practices and the health of humans, plants, animals, and ecosystems. Now, the organization works closely with communities to create and inspire trust in organic farming methods and the food that they produce.

Songtaab-Yalgré Association (SYA) (Burkina Faso) - SYA brings together women from across Burkina Faso to produce shea nuts, using the collective to simultaneously improve their literacy and their working conditions. As a locally-sourced crop, shea nuts were chosen for their potential to allow the women harvesting them to achieve a higher level of economic self-sufficiency, and empower them to become independent in their society. Workers at SYA distribute profits equally and set aside a percentage to fund community development projects as well.

Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture (United States) – The Stone Barns Center is a non-profit organization that aims to create a food system that is healthy, sustainable, and which benefits all people. On an 80-acre farm just outside of New York City, the Center offers cooking classes for all ages, organizes a seasonal market, and operates two food venues. All profits support farm operations and community education programs, and the Center encourages anyone to visit and see the benefits of a sustainable farm.

United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (International) – The Food and Agriculture Organization is the United Nations’ international agency overseeing global food security and agriculture. Among their many research areas, FAO’s main activities include knowledge-sharing among member nations, making information about food and agriculture available for all people, supporting policies to reduce malnutrition and other illnesses worldwide, rallying the international community to promote effective strategies for agricultural development, and conducting research to better understand the complex issues that face the global food system.

 WinRock (United States/International) – WinRock works with marginalized people all over the world to provide them with the skills and resources they need to bring themselves out of poverty. WinRock’s projects include, among others, empowering women and youth, and teaching environmentally responsible farming methods.

World Food Programme (WFP) (International) – The World Food Programme is an international anti-hunger organization within the United Nations that collects and distributes food assistance to populations in need. As the world’s largest organization working to combat hunger, WFP distributes food to over 90 million people annually, mainly delivering assistance to children, refugees, people in emergency situations (such as the 2010 earthquake in Haiti) and the rural poor.

World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) (Taiwan/International) – AVRDC is an international non-profit organization dedicated to reducing poverty and malnutrition in the developing world by increasing agricultural production and access to a variety of vegetables, providing essential micronutrients for populations in need. The Center works with both private and public sector partners to strike an effective balance between necessary research for new technologies and development to employ those technologies effectively.

 

Universities offering Food science study in Canada

Alberta University

British Columbia University

Greater Vancouver University

Manitoba University

Newfoundland University

Nova Scotia University

Ontario University

Quebec University

Saskatchewan University

Graduate University

Canada University

Alberta University

British Columbia University

Greater Vancouver University

Newfoundland University

Nova Scotia University

Ontario University

Quebec University

Canadian Food sector leaders

Maple Leaf Foods Inc., CA$ 22.91

Campbell Soup Company Limited

Cargill Limited

Fiera Foods Company

George Weston Limited

Kraft Canada Inc.

Unilever Canada Limited

Wrigley Canada

Olymel

Red Deer

Cornwall

Lakeside Packers

Lilydale Foods

 Olymel

Sunrise Poultry

McCain Foods Limited   

George Weston Limited                , CA$ 109.24

Saputo Inc., CA$ 30.48

La Coop fédérée             

Molson Canada, US$ 83.67

Nestlé Canada Inc, CHF 72.50

Cott Corporation, CA$ 15.32

Parmalat Dairy & Bakery Inc.      

Agropur Cooperative Agro-Alimentaire

Pepsi-QTG Canada         

General Mills Canada Corporation           

FPI Limited         

Export Packers Company Limited             

Campbell Company of Canada  

Lilydale Co-operative Limited    

Maple Lodge Farms Ltd.               

Vincor International Inc.              

SunOpta Inc.     

Breton Foods Canada Inc.           

Barry Callebaut Canada Inc.        

Clearwater Seafoods Limited Partnership            

Gay Lea Foods Co-operative Ltd.             

Van Houtte Inc.               

Carriere Foods Inc.