Food Security Market Analysis and Reports | USA Conference Series

Market Analysis - Food Security 2017

 Introduction to Food security

Global agriculture currently produces ample calories and nutrients to provide the entire world's people healthy and productive lives". However, food is not distributed equally to regions, countries, households and individuals. Improved access to food-through increased agricultural productivity and incomes-is essential to meet the food needs of the world's growing population. Food security is often defined in terms of food availability, food access and food utilization (USAID 1995). Food availability is achieved when sufficient quantities of food are consistently available to all individuals within a country. Food access is ensured when households and all individuals within them have adequate resources to obtain appropriate food for a nutritional diet. Food utilization is the proper biological use of food, requiring a diet providing sufficient energy and essential nutrients, potable water, and adequate sanitation. Successful food security and poverty-oriented programmes not only assist poor rural populations to produce more and diversified products but to produce a surplus that can be marketed and thereby generate income for the purposes of improving quality of life through improved diet and nutrition, investment in productive activity, and as collateral for credit to purchase inputs and/or other supplies to enhance agricultural or non-agricultural enterprise. Agricultural economists have maintained that greater concentration on small farmers leads to faster growth rates of both aggregate economic output and employment .Other analysts argue that production-focused service delivery directed solely at the poor as producers in isolated areas will yield low and probably diminishing returns.

Why to Attend Food Security 2016?

Food Security 2016 has been designed to address scientists, scholars, and different societies supporting food security, Industries and other related scientific communities with different levels of awareness, expertise and proactive solutions to create global impact in this field. Moreover, it will help industrialists to incorporate sustainability into every aspect of Agricultural Industries business model. The Food Security conference will influence industries to maximize their yield and profit through the application of strategic techniques. Additionally, it will reveal the best techniques to promote sustainable agricultural development and achieve a hunger free world by 2050.

The World in 2030:

  • 7.5‐8 billion people
  • Temperature increase by1 degree
  • Energy consumption is projected to be 50% higher
  • Water demand is projected to be 50% higher
  • Little wilderness, new diseases....
  • Competition for land will increase....
  • Food demand is projected to increase by 40%

Initiatives worldwide to promote food security

Ø  The government of South Africa decided in 2002 to initiate a nationwide Integrated Food Security Strategy (South Africa 2002).

Ø  The government of Brazil has set itself the goal of eradicating hunger within four years through its Programme Fome Zero (Zero Hunger Programme).

Ø  Tanzania has extended the Special Programme for Food Security, providing technical opportunities for improving the output of small farms and raising the incomes of rural families (Tanzania 2002).

Ø  Honduras, Kenya, Nicaragua, Pakistan, and Venezuela have also started to forge partnerships with other sectors of society to promote extension and foster conditions to end hunger. 

Ø  Some national governments have begun to ensure local governments possess the resources and authority to confront hunger and poverty.

Ø  Numerous countries in Latin America have moved toward decentralization, including privatization, of their extension systems since the 1980s (Berdegu 2002) and more recently toward poverty reduction (Berdegu and Escobar 2001)

The controversy around food crisis:

Ø  IMF World Economic Outlook 17 October 2007 Warns against effect of biofuel

Ø  UN Rapporteur on the Right to Food 26 October 2007 "Crime against humanity"

Ø  FAO Environment Assessment and Management Unit 1 November 2007 Ziegler’s remark regrettable

Ø  JRC Report leakage 18 January 2008 Contribution of +4% for cereals and

+24% for vegetable oil

Ø  Nestle CEO 24 March 2008 "Threat for food security"

Ø  European Environment Agency 10 April 2008 Ask for suspension of EU biofuel mandate

Ø  UN Secretary 14 April 2008 Call for a review of biofuel policies

Ø  IMF Chief Economist 14 April 2008 Contribution of 20 to 30 %

Ø  UN Rapporteur on the Right to Food 14 April 2008 "Crime against humanity"

Ø  US White House 29 April 2008 Contribution of 15%

Ø  White House Council of Economic Advisor 1st May 2008 Contribution of 2‐3%

Ø  USDA Chief Economist 21 May 2008 Contribution of 10%

Ø  US Secretary of agriculture 4 June 2008 Contribution of 2‐3%

Ø  Oxfam: "Another Inconvenient Truth" Report 25 June 2008 Contribution of 30%

Ø  World Bank "secret report" 3 July 2008 Contribution of 75%

Ø  OECD Report 16 July 2008 Contribution of: 5% for wheat 7% for corn, 19% for vegoil

Globally, almost 9 billion ha are currently in use as agricultural land or forest. 43% of this is forest area, of which about 3.5% is forest plantation. 38% is in use as permanent meadows and pastures. The remainder, is in use as arable land  or for permanent crops The share of fallow land is only small In the long run, food security depends on natural resources and sustainable innovations. Sustainable land and soil management is a crucial natural resource base which has been neglected over the years. There has been a long-standing research focus on soil and land, particularly in Central Asia and Africa. Recently, research on the economics of land degradation took place . Land prices have risen increasingly world‐wide due to increased land scarcity and raising output prices that stimulate demand for land resources. These changes have far-reaching impacts on land rights and institutions. Moreover, poor land users tend to lose out in the competition. These questions have to be addressed.

The recent trends in these land areas are Between 1995 and 2005 3

 •   Global forest area was reduced (80 Mha).

•      Arable land increased (24 Mha).

•      The area used for permanent crops increased (10 Mha). and

•      The pastures and meadows area was fairly constant.

Undernourishment means that a person is not able to acquire enough food to meet the daily minimum dietary energy requirements, over a period of one year. FAO defines hunger as being synonymous with chronic undernourishment.

o    5% -> 14.9% - Moderately low

o    <15% -> 24.9% - Moderately high  

o    25% -> 34.9% - High

o    35% and over - Very high

However, the region fell short of achieving the World Food Summit target. With 490 million people still suffering chronic hunger, the region is home to almost 62 percent of such people in the world. Eastern Asia and South-Eastern Asia have shown great success in reducing the number of hungry and have achieved the WFS target. Southern Asia, however, did not meet the WFS target. Although Eastern Asia and Southern Asia started with almost the same number of undernourished in 1990–92, the former has halved this number since then, while little has changed in the latter (Figure 4). Indeed, Southern Asia continues to be the sub region with the largest number of hungry people in the world. The number of hungry also increased in Oceania, although it is recognized that monitoring of progress by these countries is seriously hampered by data limitations. Overall, individual country performance in reducing the number of hungry differed widely. Only six of the 27 countries in the region achieved the WFS target of halving the number of undernourished. Two other countries almost reached the target, and another 14 made progress but did not achieve the target. Five countries experienced an increase in the number of undernourished.

Hunger Hotspot Analysis:

Projected changes in crop yield between 2000- 2030

The Millennium Development Goal (Target 1c)

The Millennium Development Goal hunger target measures the progress made by countries towards halving, between 1990-92 and 2015, the proportion of people suffering from undernourishment, or to bring this proportion below 5 percent.

 

·         Target 1C achieved

·         Target 1C not achieved, with slow progress

·         Target 1C not achieved, with lack of progress or deterioration

·         Missing or insufficient values

                          

Funds for Food Security:

AFRICAN AGRICULTURE FUND (AAF)

The fund targets all activities leading to the modernization of the agricultural sector on the African continent. It will invest across the value chain (from primary production to processing and tertiary services) giving priority to the following activities: cereals; livestock farming; dairy; fruit and vegetables; crop protection; logistics; fertilisers; seeds; edible oils; smallholders; and agricultural services.  The fund is supposed to be around USD 300 million as a final target, where USD 30 million is dedicated to SMEs.

GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS RESPONSE PROGRAM (GFRP)

 The target for funding is around USD 2 million. The programme provides support for grain stock management; improved use of market-based instruments to manage food prices; tax and trade policies; impact assessments; cash transfer programmes (CCTs, food stamps); school feeding; provision of food supplements; seed and fertilizer supply and market development; rehabilitation of small-scale irrigation; and improved access to finance and risk management tools.

GLOBAL AGRICULTURE FOOD SUPPLY PROGRAM (GAFSP)

The following focus areas are prioritised by the programme: high-yielding agricultural technologies; water management; land rights and land use; mobilization of rural finance to link farmers to the market; price and weather risk management; safety nets for food security; nutrition of vulnerable groups; and off-farm rural entrepreneurship. Technical assistance and capacity building are also eligible activities.  The amount of fund pledged is around USD 1.1 billion  in which 612 million has been received as of March 2012 by the countries mentioned in the figure below.

GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS RESPONSE PROGRAM (GFRP)

The programme provides support for grain stock management; improved use of market-based instruments to manage food prices; tax and trade policies; impact assessments; cash transfer programmes (CCTs, food stamps); school feeding; provision of food supplements; seed and fertilizer supply and market development; rehabilitation of small-scale irrigation; and improved access to finance and risk management tools.. the fund to be collected is around 2 USD Billion.

A project, co-directed by Wilfrid Laurier University researcher Jonathan Crush and the University of Cape Town’s African Centre for Cities director Edgar Pieterse, has been awarded $2.5 million in funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the International Development Research Centre through an International Partnerships for Sustainable Societies (IPaSS) grant.

Universities and Research Centres being funded by BBSRC Food Security:

*      Babraham Institute, UK

*      University of Adelaide, Australia

*      The Pirbright Institute, UK

*      Institute of Food Research, UK

*      John Innes Centre, UK

*      Rothamsted Research, UK

*      Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences (IBERS), Aberystwyth University, UK

*      Purdue University, USA

*      University of Birmingham,UK

*      University of Cambridge,UK

*      The University of Nottingham,UK

Major industries involved with Food Security:

  • Cargill
  • Dai
  • Dupont Food Security
  • The Aspen
  • GRM future group company

Associations Involved with Food Security Worldwide:

Ø  Ashoka Innovators for the Public (United States/International) – Ashoka has been transforming the landscape of social innovation since 1980. It is encouraging fundamental transformation of the food chain to full nutrition with an initiative linking human wellbeing, agriculture, and the environment. Australian International Food Security Centre (AIFSC) (Australia) – The AIFSC is a non-profit organization that works to promote agricultural innovation and attract investment to agricultural development projects. Aiming to build capacity for farming initiatives worldwide, it focuses on achieving specific goals like improving nutrition, connecting researchers with industry, and enhancing supply chain systems to allow farmers to bring their products to market.

Ø  Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition (BCFN) (Italy) – The Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition works to promote science and research for combating hunger and malnutrition worldwide. Using knowledge gleaned from research projects around the world, BCFN seeks to take innovative ideas for tackling food insecurity and translate them into effective policy recommendations for governments around the world.

Ø  Bioversity International (International) – Bioversity International is a research and development organization aimed at supporting smallholder farmers in the developing world through sustainable agriculture and conservation.

Ø  The Center for Studies and Development of Cambodian Agriculture (CEDAC) (Cambodia) - In partnership with Farmer and Nature Net (FNN), CEDAC has worked to promote the System of Rice Intensification (SRI), which has been shown to increase yields and improve soil fertility while reducing the use of chemicals and maintaining local ownership of seeds. CEDAC supports several other agricultural innovations and techniques including Ecological Chicken Raising (ECR), pig raising, home gardening, aquaculture, composting, and multi-purpose farming.

Ø  Chicago Council on Global Affairs Global Agricultural Development Initiative (United States/International) -  The Global Agricultural Development Initiative seeks to inform the development of U.S. policy on global agricultural development and food security by raising awareness and providing resources, information, and policy analysis to the U.S. Administration, Congress, and interested experts and organizations.

Ø  Christensen Fund (United States) – The Christensen Fund is a philanthropic organization dedicated to promoting biological and cultural diversity, making grants to organizations that work in fields like conservation science, visual arts, and education. The Fund is particularly noted for its work on agrobiodiversity and food sovereignty, in which it provides resources for indigenous and local farming communities to protect and enhance local food systems.

Ø  EARTH University (Costa Rica) – EARTH University is an international non-profit undergraduate institution based in Costa Rica focused on agricultural sciences and natural resource management. EARTH’s mission is to “prepare leaders with ethical values to contribute to the sustainable development of the tropics and to construct a prosperous and just society.”

Ø  Feeding the 5000 (United Kingdom/International) – Tristram Stuart’s initiative is organizing the world to prevent "wonky" fruits, vegetables, and other food from being wasted. Feeding the 5000 encourages farmers to participate in the “gleaning movement” – where volunteers collect unattractive produce that would otherwise be wasted for consumption.

Ø  World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) (Taiwan/International) – AVRDC is an international non-profit organization dedicated to reducing poverty and malnutrition in the developing world by increasing agricultural production and access to a variety of vegetables, providing essential micronutrients for populations in need. The Center works with both private and public sector partners to strike an effective balance between necessary research for new technologies and development to employ those technologies effectively.

Ø  United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) (International) – The Food and Agriculture Organization is the United Nations’ international agency overseeing global food security and agriculture. FAO’s main activities include knowledge-sharing among member nations, making information about food and agriculture available for all people, supporting policies to reduce malnutrition and other illnesses worldwide.

Ø  WinRock (United States/International) – WinRock works with marginalized people all over the world to provide them with the skills and resources they need to bring themselves out of poverty. WinRock’s projects include, among others, empowering women and youth, and teaching environmentally responsible farming methods.

Ø  World Vegetable Center (AVRDC) (Taiwan/International) – AVRDC is an international non-profit organization dedicated to reducing poverty and malnutrition in the developing world by increasing agricultural production and access to a variety of vegetables, providing essential micronutrients for populations in need. The Center works with both private and public sector partners to strike an effective balance between necessary research for new technologies and development to employ those technologies effectively.

Conference Series LLC with immense pleasure invites all the contributors across the globe to the 2nd   International conference on Food Security and Sustainability (Food Security 2017) during June 26-27, 2017 at San Diego, USA which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.

Conference Series LLC organizes 1000+ scientific events inclusive of 600+ Conferences, 500+ Workshops and 200+ Symposiums on various topics of Science & Technology across the globe with support from 1000 more scientific societies and Publishes 500+ Open Access journals which contains over 50000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Food security is often defined in terms of food availability, food access and food utilization. Global agriculture currently produces ample calories and nutrients to provide the entire world's people healthy and productive lives". However, food is not distributed equally to regions, countries, households and individuals. Improved access to food-through increased agricultural productivity and incomes-is essential to meet the food needs of the world's growing population. Successful food security and poverty-oriented programmes not only assist poor rural populations to produce more and diversified products but to produce a surplus that can be marketed and thereby generate income for the purposes of improving quality of life through improved diet and nutrition, investment in productive activity, and as collateral for credit to purchase inputs and/or other supplies to enhance agricultural or non-agricultural enterprise. Agricultural economists have maintained that greater concentration on small farmers leads to faster growth rates of both aggregate economic output and employment .Other analysts argue that production-focused service delivery directed solely at the poor as producers in isolated areas will yield low and probably diminishing returns.

San Diego is a major city in California, on the coast of the Pacific Ocean in Southern California. San Diego is the eighth-largest city in the United States and second-largest in California With an estimated population of 1,394,928 as of July 1, 2015, San Diego is the birthplace of California and is known for its mild year-round climate, natural deep-water harbour, extensive beaches, long association with the United States Navy and recent emergence as a healthcare and biotechnology development center. The city is the seat of San Diego County and is the economic center of the region.

Join us at Global Food Security conference for “Producing sustainable thoughts to bolster the future”. This event has been designed to address scientists, scholars, and different societies supporting food security, Industries and other related scientific communities with different levels of awareness, expertise and proactive solutions to create global impact in this field. Moreover, it will help industrialists to incorporate sustainability into every aspect of Agricultural Industries business model. The Food Security conference will influence industries to maximize their yield and profit through the application of strategic techniques. Additionally, it will reveal the best techniques to promote sustainable agricultural development and achieve a hunger free world by 2050.

We look forward to an exciting scientific event in the beautiful city of San Diego, USA.