Microbiology Market Analysis and Reports | UK Conference Series

Market Analysis - Microbiology 2020

Market Analysis

Microbiology Testing / Clinical Microbiology market size will grow from USD 3.74 billion in 2017 to USD 7.26 billion by 2023, with an expected CAGR of 11.7 per cent. The base year for the study is 2017 and the market size is estimated from 2019 to 2023. Market growth can be due to factors such as technological advances; rising prevalence of infectious diseases and a growing outbreak of epidemics; increasing expenditure on healthcare worldwide; and increasing funding, research grants and public-private investment in the field of life sciences.

The geographical area includes North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the rest of the world (RoW). North America is rising at a CAGR pace of 5.3 per cent from 2017 to 2025. Nonetheless, Latin America, like Mexico, Brazil, Colombia and Argentina, is rising at the highest CAGR of 7.8%. The global market size of Microbiology was estimated at USD 1,792.1 million in 2016. It was estimated at US$ 36.76 billion in 2015 and is estimated to reach US$ 52.35 billion by 2019. The total Microbiological Market is projected to reach US$ 278.232.9 million by 2020 at CAGR 9.4 per cent and was valued at US$ 161.851.6 million in 2014.The market is likely to continue to grow with a single-digit CAGR of 6.22% over the forecast period 2019-2028. Growing at a CAGR of 4.70 per cent during the forecast period 2019-2028, the traditional culture-based approach segment is expected to generate a value of $793.1 million in 2028. However, the market for rapid microbiological methods currently dominates the global industrial microbiological QC market and is expected to grow by 7.33% at the fastest CAGR during the 2019-2028 forecast period. Infectious diseases are primarily diagnosed in clinical trials. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 9,421 new cases of tuberculosis, 51,455 new cases of salmonella, 33,461 new cases of Lyme disease, and 433 new cases of meningococcal disease were reported in the U.S. in 2014.

Comparatively, a larger share of the US has led to higher income generation in North America, with bacterial media leading in revenue, followed by yeast and fungal cell cultures. The U.S. market is expected to increase at a steady pace due to the availability of advanced technology.  Other factors that are projected to boost progress include increasing investment by multinational companies and a high demand for better food supplements and agricultural innovation. North America is followed by Asia Pacific and is expected to grow fastest by 2025.

Importance & Scope:

Microorganisms are found all over the world, including humans, livestock, plants and other living creatures, soil, water and the air. Microbes will grow in all three environments except the atmosphere. Together, their numbers greatly outweigh all the other living cells on this planet. Microorganisms are important to all of us in a multitude of ways. The role of the microorganism in human life is both beneficial and negative. The study of microbiology contributes significantly to the understanding of life through the enhancement and interaction of microorganisms. Globally, demand for microbiologists is growing.

The scope in this area is enormous due to the presence of microbiology in many fields such as medicine, pharmacy, journal, business, clinical research, water, agriculture, chemical engineering and nanotechnology.

Agricultural microbiology–try to combat plant diseases that target important food crops, research on soil fertility and crop yield methods, etc. There is currently a great deal of interest in using bacterial or viral insect pathogens as a replacement for chemical pesticides.

Bacterial ecology–biogeochemical processes–bioremediation to reduce pollution effects Food and dairy microbiology–try to prevent bacterial spoilage of food and spread of foodborne diseases such as botulism and salmonellosis. Using microorganisms to produce foods such as cheese, yoghurt, pickles and beers.

Industrial microbiology–used to produce products such as antibiotics, vaccines, hormones, alcohols and other solvents, vitamins, amino acids and enzymes.

Microbial physiology and biochemistry –study of the synthesis of antibiotics and toxins, development of microbial energy, fixation of microbial nitrogen, effects of chemical and physical agents on microbial growth and survival, etc. Microbial genetics and molecular biology–the origin of genetic information and how it controls the production and functioning of cells and species. Development of new microbial strains that are more effective in the synthesis of useful products.

Genetic engineering–a product of the work of microbial genetics and molecular biology. Engineered microorganisms are used to produce hormones, antibiotics and vaccines.

Target Audience:

  • Researchers in life science
  • Microbiologists
  • Biotechnologists
  • Virologists
  • Parasitologists
  • Mycologists
  • Pathologists
  • Pharmacists
  • Epidemiologists
  • Health Care Professionals
  • Infectious Diseases Specialists
  • Infection Prevention and Infection Control Specialists
  • Specialist in infectious diseases and tropical medicines
  • Medical Colleges and Hospital
  • Food and Beverages Industries
  • Pharmaceutical Microbiologist
  • Public Health Microbiologist
  • Clinical Microbiologist
  • Students and Professionals
  • Research Institutes
  • Bio Technologist
  • Quality Control Clinicians
  • Marine Microbiologist
  • Farm Technicians
  • Post-graduates
  • Doctor of Philosophy

Related Companies/Industries:

  • Corning
  • Indigo Ag
  • Bruker Corporation
  • Ecovative Design
  • KWR Watercycle Research
  • John Innes Centre
  • InnovaPrep LLC
  • Fluxion Biosciences
  • Rapid Micro Biosystems Inc
  • Seres Therapeutics
  • Azitra Inc
  • Cyanotech Corporation
  • AB Biotics

Related Associations and Societies:

  • American Society for Microbiology
  • Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
  • American Association of Immunologists
  • Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research
  • International Union of Microbiological Societies
  • International Society for Antiviral Research
  • Interregional Russian Microbiological Society
  • The Interregional Association for Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
  • Russian Medical Society
  • Federation of European Microbiological Societies
  • International Society of Chemotherapy Infection and Cancer
  • Italian Society of Microbiology
  • British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
  • Society for Applied Microbiology
  • Federation of Asia-Pacific Microbiology Societies
  • International Union of Microbiological Societies
  • Chinese Society for Microbiology
  • Japan Applied Microbiology Society
  • Philippine Society for Microbiology
  • International Union of Microbiological Societies
  • International Society for Antiviral Research
  • Interregional Russian Microbiological Society
  • The Interregional Association for Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
  • Russian Medical Society
  • Federation of European Microbiological Societies
  • International Society of Chemotherapy Infection and Cancer
  • Italian Society of Microbiology
  • British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
  • Society for Applied Microbiology
  • American Society for Microbiology
  • Society for Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology
  • American Association of Immunologists
  • Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research
  • Federation of Asia-Pacific Microbiology Societies
  • International Union of Microbiological Societies
  • Chinese Society for Microbiology
  • Japan Applied Microbiology Society
  • Philippine Society for Microbiology