Pediatric Oncology Market Analysis and Reports | USA Conference Series

Market Analysis - Pediatric Oncology 2017

2nd International Conference on Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine will be held during October 05-06, 2017 at Las Vegas, Nevada, USA with the theme “Multidisciplinary program of Pediatric Oncology research and practice”. Pediatric Oncology-2017 mainly focuses on disseminating the knowledge in the field of pediatric oncology and Clinical Pediatrics.

Childhood cancer (also known as pediatric cancer) is cancer in a child. In the United States, an arbitrarily adopted standard of the ages used are 0–14 years inclusive, that is, up to 14 years 11.9 months of age. However, the definition of childhood cancer sometimes includes young adults between 15–19 years old. Pediatric oncology is the branch of medicine concerned with the diagnosis and treatment of cancer in children.

Worldwide, it is estimated that childhood cancer has an incidence of more than 175,000 per year, and a mortality rate of approximately 96,000 per year. In developed countries, childhood cancer has a mortality of approximately 20% of cases. In low resource settings, on the other hand, mortality is approximately 80% , or even 90% in the world's poorest countries. In many developed countries the incidence is slowly increasing, as rates of childhood cancer increased by 0.6% per year between 1975 to 2002 in the United States and by 1.1% per year between 1978 and 1997 in Europe

Conference Highlights:

Pediatric Oncology

Pediatric Medicine

Pediatric Hematology Oncology

Types of Pediatric Oncology

Pediatric Leukemia

Pediatric Radiology

Pediatric Neuro- Oncology

Pediatric Oncology Diagnosis

Pediatric Oncology Treatment

Pediatric Oncology Nursing

Pediatric Cancer Care

Clinical Trials

Importance and scope

The Cancer Research Center is focused on achieving major advances in controlling cancer and producing better outcomes for cancer patients, with the ultimate goal of making cancer a more manageable, and perhaps one day more curable, disease. Since its creation in the fall of 2006, the Cancer Research Center has served as the focal point for an array of activities aimed at translating the revolutionary advances researchers have made in understanding how cancer works at the cellular level into new approaches for preventing, diagnosing, and treating the disease.

Why it’s in Las Vegas, USA??

Cancer among children is a substantial public concern. Each year in the United States, approximately 12,400 children and adolescents younger than 20 years of age are diagnosed with cancer. Approximately 2,300 children and adolescents die of cancer each year, which makes cancer the most common cause of disease-related mortality for children 1-19 years of age. This monograph assembles under one cover the most detailed information available on the incidence of childhood cancer in the United States. These population-based data will be extremely important in furthering our understanding of the variations in childhood cancer by histologic type and primary site and the variations in incidence of these cancers over time. The monograph provides information about childhood cancer incidence and mortality rates that can enhance the level of public discourse, and it can be used in planning research that will help us to better understand these cancers and their causes.

Unlike adult cancers that are usually tabulated by primary site, the childhood cancers are more meaningfully grouped by histologic type and primary site based on the recently developed International Classification of Childhood Cancer (ICCC). The monograph details incidence for 1975-1995 and survival by ICCC group and by patient demographic characteristics. For each of the major ICCC groups, information on known risk factors is also presented. The monograph emphasizes not only ICCC group but also age as important factors in childhood cancer incidence. The cancers discussed include those occurring in children younger than 15 years of age as well as those occurring in adolescents up to age 19 years. Some cancers such as neuroblastoma and hepatoblastoma have highest rates among infants and young children, while others such as Hodgkin’s disease, germ cell tumors (e.g., testicular cancer) and bone cancers have higher rates among adolescents. It is important that different distributions of cancer types by age be considered when research programs are developed to improve outcomes for children and adolescents with cancer.

Why to attend?

To create opportunity for creative people and the companies they work with to develop their careers, to bring together people from a wide area to meet and share ideas. To become familiar with the Pediatric Oncology related tools available today, their cost, how they are used at other institutions and how they can be put to use in your research or project. Hear from self-taught experts in Pediatric Oncology as they share their successes and failures.

Members Associated with Pediatric Oncology Research

Hospitals Associated with Pediatric Oncology Research

Top  Pediatric Cancer Hospitals in World

  • St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
  • Boston Children's Hospital
  • Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
  • Texas Children's Hospital
  • Children's Hospital Los Angeles
  • Seattle Children's
  • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • Johns Hopkins Hospital
  • Children's Memorial Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Denver
  • The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
  • Children's Healthcare of Atlanta
  • Children's National Medical Center
  • Lucile Packard Children's Hospital
  • Children's Medical Center of Dallas
  • St. Louis Children's Hospital
  • Duke University Hospital
  • New York-Presbyterian Morgan Stanley-Komansky Children's Hospital
  • Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA
  • UCSF Medical Center
  • California, United States of America
  • Nationwide Children's Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC
  • University of Minnesota Amplatz Children's Hospital
  • University of Michigan Hospitals and Health Centers
  • Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital
  • Cleveland Clinic
  • Oregon Health & Science University
  • Primary Children's Medical Center
  • Clarian Health Partners

Societies Associated with Pediatric Oncology Research

  • Aimee's Army Childhood Cancer Foundation
  • Alex's Lemonade Stand
  • Alliance for Childhood Cancer
  • American Brain Tumor Association
  • American Childhood Cancer Organization (ACCO)
  • American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
  • Ashley Foundation
  • Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses
  • ASK Childhood Cancer Foundation
  • Bear Necessities Pediatric Cancer Foundation
  • Brain Tumor Foundation for Children, Inc.
  • Cancer Fund of America
  • Cancer Patients Aid Association (CPAA)
  • Child Health International Foundation
  • Childhood Cancer Foundation, CHOC (KwaZulu-Natal Region)
  • Children's Cancer Association
  • Colorado Kids Cancer Association
  • CURE Childhood Cancer Association
  • SIOP-International Society of Pediatric Oncology (Société Internationale d'Oncologie Pédiatrique)
  • Orange County Foundation for Oncology, Children and Families (OCF-OCF)
  • National Children's Cancer Society
  • Neuroblastoma Children's Cancer Society
  • Neuroblastoma Society of UK

 

Industries Associated with Pediatric Oncology Research

  • Zaklad Farmaceutyczny Adamed Pharma S.A.
  • Stemline Therapeutics, Inc.
  • Sanofi
  • OncoTherapy Science, Inc.
  • Grindeks
  • GlaxoSmithKline plc
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb Company
  • Bayer AG
  • Activartis Biotech GmbH

Universities Associated with Pediatric Oncology Research

Top Universities in World

  • National Cancer Institute
  • University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
  • Duke University
  • The University of Hong Kong
  • Erasmus MC
  • The University of Queensland
  • University of Kentucky
  • Karolinska Institute
  • Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • McGill University
  • University of British Columbia
  • University of Alberta
  • University of Calgary
  • University of Guelph
  • University of Victoria
  • Dalhousie University
  • University of Saskatchewan
  • University of Manitoba
  • Memorial University
  • Simon Fraser University
  • University of California, San Francisco
  • Stanford University
  • Brown University
  • Princeton University
  • Yale University
  • Stanford University
  • The University of Chicago
  • University of Pennsylvania

Market Value on Pediatric Oncology Research

The market’s significant rise through 2019 can be attributed to the industry becoming more familiar with designing and implementing trials in the pediatric population. In addition, the focus on commercially viable targets of high unmet clinical needs such as diseases designated under the Orphan Drug Act (ODA), those for pediatric oncology and the treatment of metabolic disorders. Orphan drug diseases have also provided new opportunities for the industry to target pediatric drugs to treat childhood cancers, metabolic diseases and immune-related diseases.

Pediatric Oncology Medicines: Global Markets presents the changing environment in terms of new legislation and implementation of global pediatric plans. The report analyzes market trends and identifies key therapeutic and geographical challenges and rising opportunities in the developed and developing world. It includes reviews of market revenues from 2013 and forecasts market revenues through 2019.

Market Growth of Pediatric Oncology  Research in the last and upcoming ten years

In the next 5–10 years, new technologies and biomarkers to identify early markers of cardiac disease in children undergoing treatment for ALL will probably be identified or better developed. Trials of new or existing agents to prevent and remediate myocardial damage will begin to mature, providing information for clinicians as they design a new generation of clinical trials to cure disease and minimize toxicity. These technologies will also be applied to identify subclinical disease in survivors of ALL and allow early intervention with new and known cardio-protective medications. Both pharmaceutical and tailored web-based behavioral interventions to remediate contributing chronic conditions among ALL survivors are currently being developed, and early results should be available to inform guidelines for providers of long-term ALL survivor care.

The global pediatric market was valued at $80.7 billion in 2013 and $83.6 billion in 2014. This is expected to reach nearly  $100.7 billion by 2019.

 

Fund Allotment to Pediatric Oncology Research

Since 1980, only three drugs, two used in the treatment of ALL, teniposide (1980) and clofarabine (2004),  and Unituxin (dinutuximab), recently approved in March, 2015 for use in high risk neuroblastoma,  been approved in the first instance for use in children and only four more new drugs have been approved for use by both adults and children. Since 1980, fewer than 10 drugs have been developed for use in children with cancer -including those specifically for children and those for both children and adult compared with hundreds of drugs that have been developed specifically for adults. Equally important, for many of the childhood cancers, the same treatments that existed in the 1970’s continue without change as of 2014.

The average cost of a stay in a hospital for a child with cancer is $40,000 per stay.

On average, pediatric hospitalizations for cancer cost almost five times as much as hospitalizations for other pediatric conditions.

For 2014, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) budget is $4.9 billion. It is anticipated that childhood cancer will receive 4% of that sum or $195 million.

 Prostate cancer (patient average age at diagnosis, 66 years), receives more research funding from NCI than all childhood cancers (patient average age at diagnosis, 6 years).

NCI Investment into Childhood Cancer Research2009   

 $240 million 2011   

 $197 million 2025

<$10 million at the current rate of decline  

Conference Series LLC invites all the participants from all over the world to attend "2nd International Conference on Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine" during October 05-06, 2017 in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA which includes prompt keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.

Pediatric Oncology 2017 has an incidence of more than 175,000 per year, and a mortality rate of approximately 96,000 per year. In developed countries, childhood cancer has a mortality of approximately 20% of cases. In low resource settings, on the other hand, mortality is approximately 80% , or even 90% in the world's poorest countries. In many developed countries the incidence is slowly increasing, as rates of childhood cancer increased by 0.6% per year between 1975 to 2002 in the United States and by 1.1% per year between 1978 and 1997 in Europe. Conference Series LLC organizes a conference series of 1000+ Global Events inclusive of 300+ Conferences, 500+ Upcoming and Previous Symposiums and Workshops in USA, Europe & Asia with support from 1000 more scientific societies and publishes 700+ Open access journals which contains over 30000 eminent personalities, reputed scientists as editorial board members.

Why to attend?

To create opportunity for creative people and the companies they work with to develop their careers, to bring together people from a wide area to meet and share ideas. To become familiar with the Pediatric Oncology related tools available today, their cost, how they are used at other institutions and how they can be put to use in your research or project. Hear from self-taught experts in Pediatric Oncology as they share their successes and failures.

Target Audience:

  • Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine Students, Scientists
  • Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine Researchers
  • Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine Faculty
  • Medical Colleges
  • Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine Associations and Societies
  • Business Entrepreneurs
  • Training Institutes
  • Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Companies
  • Software Developing Companies
  • Data Management Companies
  • Pediatric Oncology and Pediatric Medicine Physicians