Pulmonary Disorders Market Analysis and Reports | USA Conference Series

Market Analysis - Pulmonary Disorders 2017

Market Report Pulmonary Disorders 2017

The American Lung Association in its annual “State of the Air” report, released today, gave Las Vegas-Henderson a failing grade and ranked it as the 10th worst among 277 metropolitan areas in the country for ozone pollution.

The report found that while the valley’s high-ozone days had fallen significantly since 1996, the 19.7 high-ozone days measured were well above the “safe” standard of four days annually.

     Los Angeles-Long Beach, with 121.8 high-ozone days, topped the list for the nation’s worst pollution. In all, six California metropolitan areas were in the top 10. The report said half of Americans live in counties where ozone or particle pollutions levels make the air unhealthy to breathe.

     The 15th annual national report card said while the nation overall continued to reduce particle pollution, poor air quality remains a significant public health concern. The report said ozone levels were much worse than in its 2013 report.

     Those most at risk from ozone pollution are infants, children, teenagers and older adults; anyone with lung diseases like asthma or COPD; and people with heart disease or diabetes.

     The issue of adverse health effects of ambient air pollution has been extensively studied and reported worldwide over the past two decades in Las Vegas. The urban area of Reno and Sparks in northern Nevada is one of two major urban centers in Nevada; the other is Las Vegas. The northern area, which has undergone a rapid population growth in the last decade, has special geographic characteristics and air pollution patterns.

     The American Lung Association’s 2016 “State of the Air” report found Las Vegas ranked as the 60th-most polluted city in the nation for year-round particle pollution. Compared to the 2015 report, Las Vegas has seen an increase in year-round particles. This is in spite of a trend seen across the nation of lower particle pollution levels.

“The 2016 ‘State of the Air’ report finds unhealthful levels of ozone in Las Vegas, putting our local citizens at risk for premature death and other serious health effects such as asthma attacks and cardiovascular harm. And, since we have such high levels of year-round particle pollution, our citizens face increase the risk for lung cancer,” said Kristina Crawford, Executive Director of the American Lung Association in Nevada - Las Vegas. “Across the nation, the report found continued improvement in air quality, but more than half of the people in the United States live in counties that have unhealthful levels of either ozone or particle pollution.”

     Each year the “State of the Air” reports on the two most widespread outdoor air pollutants, ozone and particle pollution. The report analyzes particle pollution in two ways: through average annual particle pollution levels and short-term spikes in particle pollution. Both ozone and particle pollution are dangerous to public health and can be lethal. But the trends reported in this year’s report, which covers data collected in 2012-2014, are strikingly different for these pollutants nationwide, and also in Las Vegas.

A good news of for Las Vegas is that, compared to the 2015 report (2011-2013), Las Vegas experienced fewer unhealthy days of high ozone in this year’s report.

The 2016 report also found year-round particle pollution (soot) levels in 2012-2014 slightly higher than the 2015 report. Nationwide, the best progress in this year’s report came in reducing year-round levels of particle pollution.

       The 2016 report also tracked short-term spikes in particle pollution, as these can be extremely dangerous and even lethal. According to the 2016 report, Las Vegas has more days when short-term particle pollution has reached unhealthy levels in 2012-2014. This is in keeping with a trend seen across the nation of short-term spikes in particle pollution. Thus, the above parameters directly influence the pulmonary, respiratory lungs disease in Nevada USA. The graphic below presents the Top 10 leading causes of death in Nevada between 2000 and 2008, ranked by the percentage of all deaths due to that cause. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in both the United States and Nevada, accounting for over a quarter of all deaths in the Silver State. Cancer also contributes to a large percentage of deaths in the U.S. and Nevada (22.6%). Estimates are that cancer has led to over 4 million years of lost life in the U.S.3 Diabetes, although a relatively less prevalent cause of death in Nevada (1.8%) is an indicator of and contributor to both heart disease and cancer deaths. It is shown in figure as below;



            The incidence, morbidity and mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are rising throughout the world. The total economic cost of COPD in the US in 1993 was estimated to be over $US15.5 billion, with $US6.1 billion for hospitalisation, $US4.4 billion for physician and other fees, $US2.5 billion for drugs, $US1.5 billion for nursing home care and $US1.0 billion for home care. Office visits, hospital outpatient visits and emergency department visits accounted for 17.3% of the direct costs for COPD in the US. When stratified by severity, COPD treatment costs strongly correlate with disease severity.

       The American Thoracic Society, the European Respiratory Society and the British Thoracic Society have developed guidelines for the pharmacological treatment of COPD. However, the guidelines establish inhaled bronchodilators (anticholinergic agents and beta 2-adrenergic agonists) as the mainstay of therapy for patients with COPD. The guidelines were not based on cost analyses and thus are not a priori cost-effective guidelines. Since the publication of these guidelines, several new pharmacological products have been approved for use in patients with COPD including a combination of an anticholinergic and selective beta 2-adrenergic agonist [ipratropium/salbutamol (albuterol)] and a long-acting beta 2-adrenergic agonist (salmeterol). Both products are effective bronchodilators in COPD.

       The purpose of this report is to place these new agents in an updated pharmacological guideline scheme, utilizing recently published data on clinical efficacy as well as pharmacoeconomics. The annualized healthcare costs were computed to be $US788/patient/year for the combination ipratropium/salbutamol inhaler and $US1059/patient/year for salmeterol (1999 values). Based upon an improved understanding of the complexity of COPD, the response of patients to newer bronchodilators (given individually or in combination), and recent pharmacoeconomic data for COPD treatment, a new treatment algorithm with associated costs is proposed. The use of an algorithm, based on medical and pharmacoeconomic data, will improve lung function in patients with COPD, improve patient satisfaction (e.g. quality of life, dyspnoea) and outcomes (e.g. exacerbations).

       Lung cancer is by far the most common cause of cancer death in Nevada, killing almost 50 out of every 100,000 people in Nevada in 2008. About 31% of cancer deaths among men and 26% among women are from lung cancer. Lung cancer deaths have historically been higher among whites, while rates have been lowest among Hispanics and Asians.

Nevada Lung Cancer Mortality Trends:



The above clearly indicates that there is a need of the more numbers of Physicians of Pulmonary Associates, involved in advance research and medical education. There is a need of serious talk and discussions on this particular area to know the depth of its severity and solution to eradicate the related diseases.

List of approved drugs for the Pulmonary and respiratory diseases in USA;

Drugs Approved in 2016

1.  Bevespi Aerosphere (glycopyrrolate and formoterol fumarate); AstraZeneca; For the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Approved April 2016

2.  Cinqair (reslizumab); Teva Pharmaceuticals; For the treatment of severe asthma, Approved March 2016

Drugs Approved in 2015

1. Alecensa (alectinib); Roche; For the treatment of ALK-positive, metastatic non-small cell lung cancer , Approved December 2015

2. Keytruda (pembrolizumab); Merck; For the treatment of PD-L1 positive advanced non-small cell lung cancer, Approved October 2015

3. Nucala (mepolizumab); GlaxoSmithKline; For the treatment of severe asthma with an eosinophilic phenotype, Approved November 2015

4. Opdivo (nivolumab); Bristol-Myers Squibb; For the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Approved March 2015

5. Orkambi (lumacaftor and ivacaftor); Vertex Pharmaceuticals; For the treatment of cystic fibrosis, Approved July 2015

6. Portrazza (necitumumab) ; Eli Lilly; For the treatment of metastatic squamous non-small cell lung cancer, Approved November 2015

7. Stiolto Respimat (tiotropium bromide and olodaterol) ; Boehringer Ingelheim; For the maintenance of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Approved May 2015

8. Tagrisso (osimertinib); AstraZeneca; For the treatment of EGFR T790M mutation positive non-small cell lung cancer , Approved November 2015

9. Utibron Neohaler (indacaterol and glycopyrrolate); Novartis; For the long term, maintenance treatment of airflow obstruction in patients with COPD, Approved October 2015

Drugs Approved in 2014

1. Arnuity Ellipta (fluticasone furoate inhalation powder); GlaxoSmithKline; For the treatment of asthma, Approved August 2014

2. Esbriet (pirfenidone); InterMune; For the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , Approved October 2014

3. Grastek (Timothy Grass Pollen Allergen Extract); Merck; For the treatment of grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis, Approved April 2014

4. Incruse Ellipta (umeclidinium inhalation powder); GlaxoSmithKline; For the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Approved May 2014

5. Ofev (nintedanib); Boehringer Ingelheim; For the treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , Approved October 2014

6. Oralair (Sweet Vernal, Orchard, Perennial Rye, Timothy and Kentucky Blue Grass Mixed Pollens Allergen Extract); Greer Labs; For the treatment of grass pollen-induced allergic rhinitis with or without conjunctivitis, Approved April 2014

7. Ragwitek (Short Ragweed Pollen Allergen Extract); Merck; For the treatment of short ragweed pollen-induced allergic rhinitis, Approved April 2014

8. Striverdi Respimat (olodaterol); Boehringer Ingelheim; For the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease , Approved July 2014

9. Zykadia (ceritinib); Novartis; For the treatment of ALK+ metastatic non-small cell lung cancer, Approved April 2014

Drugs Approved in 2013

1. Adempas (riociguat); Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals; For the treatment of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension, Approved October 2013

2. Anoro Ellipta (umeclidinium and vilanterol inhalation powder); GlaxoSmithKline; For the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Approved December of 2013

3. Breo Ellipta (fluticasone furoate and vilanterol inhalation powder); GlaxoSmithKline; For the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Approved May 2013

4. Opsumit (macitentan); Actelion Pharmaceuticals; For the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, Approved October 2013

5. Vibativ (telavancin); Theravance; For the treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia caused by staph aureus, Approved June 2013

List of Medical research centers in the USA.
 

  1. Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture
  2. AIDS Research Alliance
  3. Alfred E. Mann Institute for Biomedical Engineering
  4. American College of Rheumatology Research and Education Foundation
  5. American College of Surgeons Oncology Group
  6. American Roentgen Ray Society
  7. Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging
  8.  
  9. Dana–Farber Cancer Institute
  10. Dana–Farber/Harvard Cancer Center
  11. Duke Cancer Institute
  12. Duke University Human Vaccine Institute
  13.  
  14. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group
  15. Emerging Pathogens Institute
  16. Epilepsy Foundation of Florida University
  17. Eppley Institute for Research in Cancer and Allied Diseases
  18. Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
  19.  
  20. Galveston National Laboratory
  21. Ganogen Research Institute
  22. Genetics Society of America
  23. George Washington University School of Medicine & Health Sciences
  24. Gladstone Institutes
  25. Gottlieb Institute
  26.  
  27. Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute
  28. Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine
  29. Hormel Institute
  30. House Ear Institute
  31. Howard Hughes Medical Institute
  32. Huntington Medical Research Institutes
  33. Huntsman Cancer Foundation
  34. Huntsman Cancer Institute
  35.  
  36. The Biodesign Institute
  37. Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies
  38. Tower Cancer Research Foundation
  39.  
  40. University of Central Florida College of Medicine
  41. University of South Florida College of Medicine
  42. USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center
  43. USF Health Byrd Alzheimer's Institute
  1. Beckman Research Institute
  2. Bone Disease Program of Texas
  3. The Bonnie J. Addario a Breath Away from the Cure Foundation
  4. Boonshoft School of Medicine
  5. Brain Injury Research Institute
  6. Buck Institute for Research on Aging
  7.  
  8. Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation
  9. Institute of Biosciences and Technology
  10. Institute of Gerontology
  11.  
  12. Jackson Laboratory
  13. John Paul II Medical Research Institute
  14. Kenneth S. Warren Institute
  15.  
  16. La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology
  17. Lahey Hospital & Medical Center
  18. Lieber Institute for Brain Development
  19. Linus Pauling Institute
  20. Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute
  21.  
  22. Markey Cancer Center
  23. Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center
  24. The Mind Research Network
  25. H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute
  26. Myelin Repair Foundation
  27.  
  28. National Center for Biotechnology Information
  29. National Center for Integrative Biomedical Informatics
  30. National Comprehensive Cancer Network
  31. National Space Biomedical Research Institute
  32. National Wilms Tumor Study Group
  33. The Neurosciences Institute
  34. Nevada Cancer Institute
  35. New York Blood Center
  36. Nicholas Institute of Sports Medicine and Athletic Trauma
  37. Norris Cotton Cancer Center
  38.  
  39. Van Andel Institute
  40.  
  41. Winship Cancer Institute
  42.  
  43. Yale Cancer Center
  44. Yerkes National Primate Research Center
  45.  
  46. Zilkha Neurogenetic Institute
  47. UW Carbone Cancer Center
  1. California Institute for Regenerative Medicine
  2. California National Primate Research Center
  3. Cancer and Leukemia Group B
  4. Cancer Therapy & Research Center
  5. Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research
  6. Center for Cell and Gene Therapy
  7. Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics & Policy
  8. Center for Infectious Disease Research
  9. Center for Neural Science
  10. Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  12. The Christopher and Dana Reeve Paralysis Resource Center
  13. City of Hope National Medical Center
  14. Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute
  15. Collaborative Study On The Genetics of Alcoholism
  16. Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS
  17. CONRAD (organization)
  18. Coriell Institute for Medical Research
  19.  
  20. Pacific Northwest Diabetes Research Institute
  21. Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
  22. Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation
  23. Pritzker Neuropsychiatric Disorders Research Consortium
  24.  
  25. Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine
  26.  
  27. Quality Assurance Review Center
  28.  
  29. Rice Center for Neuroengineering
  30. Roswell Park Cancer Institute
  31.  
  32. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital
  33. Salk Institute for Biological Studies
  34. Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute
  35. Sarah Cannon Research Institute
  36. Scripps Research Institute
  37. Seattle Children's Research Institute
  38. Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior
  39. SWOG

 

  1.  Pulmonary Disorders
  2. Symptoms of Pulmonary Disorders
  3. Pulmonary Function Testing and Diagnosis
  4. Acute Bronchitis
  5. Asthma and Related Disorders
  6. Bronchiectasis and Atelectasis
  7. COPD and Related Disorders
  8. Pulmonary Vascular Disease
  9. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage
  10. Environmental Pulmonary Diseases
  11. Lung Diseases
  12. Pleural Effusion
  13. Pulmonary Embolism
  14. Sleep Apnea
  15. Pulmonary Research
  16. Pulmonary Rehabilitation
  17. Novel Approach and Therapies
     

There about 22 research centres in North America for the research and treatment of pulmonary and other respiratory related diseases.

  1. Over the course of the seven years of the study, 22 research centers around the North American countries, enrolled and treated participants. Thirteen centers participated for the majority of the active project, and participants from these centers comprise 90 percent of the total number enrolled.
  2. Baylor College of Medicine; Houston, TX Principal Investigator, Lauren B. Marangell, MD
  3. Case Western Reserve University; Cleveland, OH Principal Investigator, Joseph R. Calabrese, MD
  4. University of Colorado Health Sciences Center; Denver, CO Principal Investigator, Michael Allen, MD
  5. University of Louisville School of Medicine; Louisville, KY Principal Investigator, Rif El-Mallakh, MD
  6. Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Medicine; Boston, MA Principal Investigator, Andrew A. Nierenberg, MD
  7. University of Massachusetts Medical School; Worcester, MA Principal Investigator, Jayendra Patel, MD
  8. University of Missouri School of Medicine; Kansas City, MO Principal Investigator, Kemal Sagduyu, MD
  9. University of Oklahoma College of Medicine - Tulsa; Tulsa, OK Principal Investigator, Mark D. Fossey, MD
  10. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Medical Center; Philadelphia, PA Principal Investigator, Laszlo Gyulai, MD
  11. University of Pittsburgh Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic; Pittsburgh, PA Principal Investigator, Michael E. Thase, MD
  12. Portland Veteran’s Administration Medical Center; Portland, OR Principal Investigator, Peter Hauser, MD
  13. Stanford University School of Medicine; Stanford, CA Principal Investigator, Terence A. Ketter, MD
  14. University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX Principal Investigator, Charles Bowden, MD

    Additional centres involved involves in respiratory education are: Howard University, Washington DC; Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke’s Medical Center, Chicago, IL; State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY; Weill Medical College of Cornell University and New York Presbyterian Hospital, NY, NY; New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY; University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ; and Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC.

Major Associations around the Globe for Pulmonary and Respiratory Diseases.

  1. Alabama Society for Respiratory Care
  2. Alaska Society for Respiratory Care
  3. Associazione Scientifica Interdisciplinare per lo Studio delle Malattie Respiratorie (AIMAR) (Italy)
  4. Associazione Italiana Pneumologi Ospedalieri (AIPO) (Italy)
  5. American Association for Respiratory Care (AARC) (United States)
  6. American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) (United States)
  7. American Thoracic Society (ATS) (United States)
  8. Asian Pacific Society of Respirology (APSR)
  9. Asociación Argentina de Medicina Respiratoria (Argentina)
  10. Associación Latin Americana del Tórax (ALAT)
  11. Austrian Society of Pneumology (ASP) (Austria)
  12. Belgian Thoracic Society
  13. Brazilian Thoracic Society
  14. British Thoracic Society
  15. Bulgarian Society of Respiratory Diseases
  16. California Society for Respiratory Care
  17. Canadian Society for Respiratory Therapy
  18. Canadian Thoracic Society
  19. Croatian Respiratory Society
  20. Colorado Society for Respiratory Care
  21. Deutsche Gesellschaft für Pneumologie und Beatmungsmedizin e.V. (Germany)
  22. Dutch Thoracic Society (NVALT)
  23. European Respiratory Society (ERS)
  24. Egyptian Society of Chest Diseases and Tuberculosis
  25. European Society of Thoracic Imaging (ESTI)
  26. Estonian Respiratory Society
  27. European Academy of Allergology and Clinical Immunology (EAACI)
  28. European Federation of Allergy and Airways Diseases Patients’ Associations (EFA)
  29. European Lung Foundation (ELF) ( World Spirometry Day (WSD) )
  30. Global Smoke Free Partnership (GSP)
  31. Hellenic Thoracic Society (Greece)
  32. Hungarian Respiratory Society
  33. Indian Chest Society
  34. International Society for Aerosolin Medicine (ISAM)
  35. Irish Thoracic Society
  36. Kazakhstan National Respiratory Society (Kazakhstan)
  37. Kyrgyz Thoracic Society
  38. Latvian Society of Lung Physicians
  39. Lebanese Pulmonary Society
  40. Médecins sans frontières (MSF) (Doctors Without Borders)
  41. Moroccan Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  42. National Research Institute of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease (Iran)
  43. National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC)
  44. Pakistan Chest Society
  45. Pan African Thoracic Society (PATS)
  46. Polish Respiratory Society
  47. Primary Care Respiratory Journal (PCRJ)
  48. Romanian Society of Pneumology
  49. Russian Respiratory Society
  50. Saudi Thoracic Society
  51. Schweizerische Gesellschaft für Pneumologie (Switzerland)
  52. Slovak Pneumological and Ftiseological Society
  53. Slovenian Respiratory Society
  54. Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias (Chile)
  55. Sociedad Española de Neumología y Cirugía Torácica (Spain)
  56. Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia (Portugal)
  57. Société Algérienne de Pneumophtisiologie (Algeria)
  58. Société de Pneumologie de Langue Française (SPLF)
  59. Society of Albanian Pulmonologists
  60. South African Thoracic Society
  61. Taiwan Society of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
  62. Texas Society for Respiratory Care
  63. The European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery (EACTS)
  64. The Finnish Respiratory Society
  65. The Japanese Respiratory Society
  66. Tunisian Society of Respiratory Disease and Allergology
  67. Turkish Respiratory Society
  68. Turkish Thoracic Society


Target Audience:

  1. Respiratory Therapist
  2. Respiratory practitioner
  3. Respiratory Care Practitioner (RCP)
  4. Respiratory scientist
  5. Respiratory Nurse
  6. Respiratory Physiotherapist
  7. Clinical Respiratory Physiologist
  8. Pulmonologist
  9. Physician assistant


Current Status of Respiratory Drug Market in USA.

The respiratory drugs market in the Americas is likely to exceed USD 36 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of over 5%. The Americas accounted for 55.5% of the overall market share in 2015, with the US being the major revenue contributor.

However, there are opportunities such as the expansion of immunotherapy in emerging markets such as Brazil and Mexico. In addition, the launch of new disease-modifying therapies will prove to be a major factor driving the market growth in this region.

EMEA: increased awareness about respiratory diseases to boost growth

EMEA accounted for 27% of the global respiratory drugs market share in 2015. The market in EMEA is dominated by the UK, Germany, France, Italy, and Spain. Growing older adult population and focus on combination therapies are driving the market growth in this region.

The respiratory drugs market in EMEA is likely to exceed USD 18 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of over 6%. The market in EMEA is likely to grow at a moderate pace during the forecast period driven by increased awareness about respiratory diseases and cost-effective over-the-counter (OTC) drugs.

APAC: fastest growing market for respiratory drugs

The respiratory drugs market in APAC is expected to exceed USD 14 billion by 2020, growing at a CAGR of over 10%. APAC accounted for 17.5% of the global respiratory drugs market in 2015. The market in APAC is expected to grow rapidly as compared to the other regions due to increasing healthcare spending in this region. Japan, India, and China are the major revenue contributors to the market in this region. India and China together form the most lucrative markets in APAC because of their rapid economic growth.

As per the latest report, there are significant growth opportunities in countries such as China, Japan, and India because of healthcare investments provided by the respective governments and increasing out-of-pocket expenditure by individuals. “However, the increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies to treat respiratory diseases may offset the market growth.

Some of the top vendors in the global respiratory drugs market highlighted in the report are:

AstraZeneca
Boehringer Ingelheim
F. Hoffmann-La Roche
GlaxoSmithKline
Merck
Novartis


Cost of Respiratory and related Drugs in the USA

Brand Names

Drug Class

Prices (in $) per pill/unit

amoxicillin

Penicillin Antibiotics

9

Keflex (cephalexin)

Cephalosporin Antibiotics

11

Cipro
(ciprofloxacin)

Quinolone Antibiotics

10

Sulfatrim


Antifolate / Sulfa Antibiotic Combinations

8

Zithromax (azithromycin)

Macrolide Antibiotics

10

Bactrim

Antifolate

8

Septra

Antifolate

8

Augmentin

Penicillin Antibiotic / Beta Lactamase Inhibitor Combinations

18

Flagyl

Nitroimidazole Antibiotics

11

 

Likewise, there are more number of medicine with less popularity

Vibramycin 
(doxycycline hyclate)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $33   |
DOXYCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It kills certain bacteria or stops their growth. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like dental, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections. It also treats acne, Lyme disease, malaria, and certain sexually transmitted infections.

Vibramycin Monohydrate
(doxycycline monohydrate)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $35

Monodox
(doxycycline monohydrate)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $35

Levaquin(levofloxacin)   Quinolone Antibiotics   $10  
Levaquin (levofloxacin) is a quinolone antibiotic similar to ciprofloxacin (Cipro), used to treat bacterial infections. Levofloxacin is considered a first-line treatment for urinary tract infections and is also used for sinusitis, bronchitis and pneumonia. Levofloxacin is taken once a day, compared to ciprofloxacin which is twice a day. It is available as generic levofloxacin.

Cefdinir   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $26  
CEFDINIR is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Dynacin
(minocycline)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $195
MINOCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It stops the growth of some bacteria. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like acne, respiratory, urinary tract, and sexually transmitted infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Minocin(minocycline)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $195
MINOCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It stops the growth of some bacteria. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like acne, respiratory, urinary tract, and sexually transmitted infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Ofloxacin   Quinolone Antibiotics   $13
OFLOXACIN is a quinolone antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Erythromycin   Macrolide Antibiotics   $26
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Ceftin(cefuroxime axetil)   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $53
CEFUROXIME is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Biaxin(clarithromycin)   Macrolide Antibiotics   $22
CLARITHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat or prevent certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Ampicillin   Penicillin Antibiotics   $15
AMPICILLIN is a penicillin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Cefprozil   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $51
CEFPROZIL is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Avelox(moxifloxacin)   Quinolone Antibiotics   $91
MOXIFLOXACIN is a quinolone antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Tetracycline  Tetracycline Antibiotics   $363
TETRACYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Vancomycin   Glycopeptide Antibiotics   $293
VANCOMYCIN is a glycopeptide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections in the bowel. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Doryx
(doxycycline hyclate er)   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $139

DOXYCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections, Lyme disease, and malaria. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Ery-Tab   Macrolide Antibiotics   $381
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Suprax
(cefixime)   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $158
CEFIXIME is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Clarithromycin ER   Macrolide Antibiotics   $77
CLARITHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat or prevent certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

E.E.S.(erythromycin ethylsuccinate)   Macrolide Antibiotics   $522
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Eryped   Macrolide Antibiotics   $390
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Rocephin
(ceftriaxone)   Cephalosporin Antibiotics  $9
CEFTRIAXONE is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Erythrocin   Macrolide Antibiotics   $501
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Cefaclor   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $67
CEFACLOR is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Acticlate   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $819
DOXYCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It kills certain bacteria or stops their growth. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like dental, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections. It also treats acne, Lyme disease, malaria, and certain sexually transmitted infections.

Erythromycin DR   Macrolide Antibiotics   $95
ERYTHROMYCIN is a macrolide antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Vibramycin Calcium   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $51
DOXYCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It kills certain bacteria or stops their growth. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like dental, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections. It also treats acne, Lyme disease, malaria, and certain sexually transmitted infections.

Demeclocycline   Tetracycline Antibiotics  $ 467
DEMECLOCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Cefazolin   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $6
CEFAZOLIN is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat or prevent certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Cedax
(ceftibuten)   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $237
CEFTIBUTEN is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Morgidox   Tetracycline Antibiotics   $96
DOXYCYCLINE is a tetracycline antibiotic. It kills certain bacteria or stops their growth. It is used to treat many kinds of infections, like dental, skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections. It also treats acne, Lyme disease, malaria, and certain sexually transmitted infections.

Factive   Quinolone Antibiotics   $216
GEMIFLOXACIN is a quinolone antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Spectracef   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $440
CEFDITOREN is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Cefaclor ER   Cephalosporin Antibiotics   $275
CEFACLOR is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat certain kinds of bacterial infections. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections.

Pce   Macrolide Antibiotics   $75

Virazole   Nucleoside Analogue Antivirals   $25,619
RIBAVIRIN is an antiviral medicine. It is used to treat severe respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in hospitalized children.

Synagis   Monoclonal Antibodies   $1,443  
PALIVIZUMAB is an antibody. It is used in infants and children to prevent severe cases of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection. Children treated with this medicine may still get RSV but will not get as sick as if they were not treated at all. This medicine does not protect against other infections.

Azactam
(aztreonam)   Monobactam Antibiotics  $ 65
Major advancement in treatment of Bipolar Disorder

Respiratory Care Devices Market worth 21.9 Billion USD by 2020
     The respiratory care devices market is growing at a significant rate since the last decade. Growth in this market is mainly attributed to the high prevalence of respiratory diseases, rising aging population across the globe, the high prevalence of smoking, rising urbanization and pollution levels, increasing incidences of preterm births, and lifestyle changes. However, lack of awareness and harmful effects of certain respiratory care devices on neonates are the major challenges in this market.

     In this report, the respiratory care devices market is segmented on the basis of products and end users. On the basis of products, the respiratory care devices market is segmented into therapeutic devices, monitoring devices, diagnostic devices, and consumables & accessories. The therapeutic devices segment is further divided into humidifiers, nebulizers, oxygen concentrators, positive airway pressure (PAP) devices, reusable resuscitators, ventilators, inhalers, masks, nitric oxide delivery units, and oxygen hoods. The monitoring devices segment is categorized into pulse oximeters, capnograph, and gas analyzers. The diagnostics devices segment is subdivided into spirometers, peak flow meters, polysomnography (PSG) devices, and other diagnostic devices; while, the consumables and accessories segment is categorized into disposable masks, disposable resuscitators, tracheostomy tubes, nasal cannulas, and other consumables & accessories.

     In 2014, the therapeutic devices segment accounted for the largest share of the global respiratory care devices market. The large share of this segment is mainly attributed to the rising adoption of various therapeutic devices such as nebulizers, oxygen concentrators, humidifiers, and PAP devices due to growth in the elderly population and rising prevalence of respiratory diseases.

On the basis of end users, the respiratory care devices market is bifurcated into hospitals and home care. Hospitals are the major end users of the global respiratory care devices market, owing to the financial capabilities of hospitals to purchase high-end instruments as well as the availability of trained professionals to operate respiratory care devices.

     On the basis of regions, the respiratory care devices market is broadly segmented into North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, and the Middle East & Africa. Highly developed healthcare systems and rising healthcare expenditures are the major factors responsible for the large shares of North America and Europe in the global respiratory care devices market. However, the Asia-Pacific region is expected to grow at the highest CAGR, owing to the presence of a large pool of respiratory patients, increasing healthcare expenditure, rapidly developing healthcare infrastructure, increasing per capita incomes, and growing middle-class population in emerging countries of this region.

     Major players in the global respiratory care devices market include Philips Healthcare (Netherlands), ResMed, Inc. (U.S.), Covidien plc (Ireland), Masimo Corporation (U.S.), Fisher and Paykel Healthcare Limited (New Zealand), and CareFusion Corporation (U.S.).

Pulmonary and related respiratory diseases;
Pulmonary Disease is very common. Approximately 12 million adults in the U.S. are diagnosed with pulmonary disease, and 120,000 die from it each year. An additional 12 million adults in the U.S. are thought to have the undiagnosed pulmonary disease. Pulmonary Disease death rates for women have risen steadily. Today, more women than men die from pulmonary disease each year. Today, spirometry is widely available to doctors in primary care settings, facilitating earlier diagnosis of pulmonary disease. Doctors now recognize that nicotine addiction makes it very difficult for people to stop smoking. Fortunately, methods for smoking cessation have improved, and smokers can benefit from effective treatments and counseling to overcome nicotine addiction.

     A wide range of treatments are now available to improve the quality and length of life for pulmonary disease patients, including vaccinations against influenza and pneumonia, inhaled bronchodilator drugs, pulmonary rehabilitationoxygen therapy, and surgical interventions. Glucocorticoids and antibiotics are regularly used to treat acute exacerbations of pulmonary disease.

     Several NIH-sponsored research programs have increased understanding of pulmonary disease and fostered new treatments. For example, the Nocturnal Oxygen Therapy Trial showed that some patients with advanced pulmonary disease live longer if given long-term oxygen therapy. The Lung Health Study showed that a smoking cessation intervention can improve long-term survival of Pulmonary Disease patients. The National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT) (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/prof/lung/nett/lvrsweb.htm) showed that lung-volume-reduction surgery can improve the quality and/or length of life in certain groups of patients with severe pulmonary disease. Although researchers continue to investigate the role of proteases in pulmonary disease, new findings suggest strong inflammatory and immune components to pulmonary disease. This insight led to a variety of new ideas about Pulmonary Disease treatment and has stimulated a surge in research activity.

Despite rapidly rising illness and death rates due to pulmonary disease, awareness of the pulmonary disease among the general public and those at greatest risk for the disease remains low.

     To promote public awareness of the pulmonary disease, the NIH is partnering with patient advocacy groups and health professional organizations on a pulmonary disease awareness and education campaign called pulmonary disease: Learn More, Breathe Better (http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/lung/Pulmonary Disease/lmbb-campaign/index.htm). The campaign focuses on increasing knowledge of symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment among pulmonary disease patients and people at risk of developing pulmonary disease.

Future of Pulmonary and Respiratory related diseases.

     It is now recognized that 10-20% of pulmonary disease patients have never smoked! Furthermore, only a fraction of smokers develop pulmonary disease, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors influence the risk of developing pulmonary disease. Investigators in the pulmonary disease gene Study will recruit 10,000 smokers and nonsmokers to identify the genetic factors that determine why some people develop pulmonary disease and others do not.

Pulmonary Disease is a complex disease that presents in many different ways. The NIH is supporting research to help tailor therapies for pulmonary disease to individual patients. A study called SPIROMICS (subpopulations and intermediate outcome measures in pulmonary disease study) will use genetic data, genomic information, and analyses of phenotypes and biomarkers to determine how pulmonary disease differentially affects patient subpopulations.

     The NIH pulmonary disease Clinical Research Network (CCRN) is performing therapeutic trials in patients with moderate to severe pulmonary disease, with an emphasis on preventing and managing exacerbations. One study is comparing the effectiveness of two different pneumococcal vaccines in patients with pulmonary disease. Another study will determine whether an antibiotic called azithromycin is useful in reducing the severity and number of exacerbations. In addition, statin drugs, best known for their use in lowering cholesterol, are being evaluated for their possible role in preventing or diminishing pulmonary disease exacerbations.

The NIH, in cooperation with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, is supporting the Long-Term Oxygen Treatment Trial (LOTT) to determine whether supplemental oxygen is beneficial to patients with the milder disease than those studied previously. The NIH also supports the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC), which provides lung tissue specimens to qualified researchers investigating the biological basis of PULMONARY DISEASE and other lung diseases.

The NIH supports research to improve understanding of the disease process in pulmonary disease, identify pivotal points in its onset and progression, and provide the knowledge base needed to intervene early and prevent its development or progression.

The conference Pulmonary Disorders 2017 will be organized around the theme “Advanced Research and innovative Therapeutics Approaches towards Pulmonary Disorders”.

Our whole committee members are headed up for dazzling and enlightening scientific conference which includes lectures, speakers, symposia, workshops on different topics, poster presentations and various programs for participants from all around the world. We take immense pleasure inviting you to join us at Pulmonary Disorders 2017. You can have a world class experience with the eminent of this particular area. All members of Pulmonary Disorders 2017 organizing committee look forward in meeting you in Las Vegas, USA.

Importance and scope;
            A Pulmonary Disorders introduction, which defines the disease, including symptoms, diagnosis and treatment.
A detail discussion on innovative and advance research towards pulmonary disorders, analysis of the COPD pipeline, detailing, among other parameters, drug distribution by phase, molecule type and mechanism of action.
The COPD, respiratory and Lungs clinical trial landscape analysis, with a particular emphasis on failure rates across phases as well as the trends in clinical trial size and duration and by mechanism of action.
An analysis of the COPD, Respiratory and Lungs marketed landscape, including a comparison of the efficacy and safety of the most prominent brands, displayed as a heat map.

            An in-depth forecasting model for the COPDrespiratory and lungs market in Las Vegas, USA which considers the current marketed therapies, in addition to the potential market entry of new products. Discussion would include a projected outcome, with high and low variance results, depending on the potential performance of pipeline therapies. This takes into account worst and best case scenarios for market uptake, costs and patent expirations. Strategic consolidations within the COPD, pulmonary, respiratory and lungs clinical trial of Las Vegas indication are analysed.
An overview of the drivers and barriers for the COPD market is also included.

            The global COPD market is estimated to currently be worth $11.3 billion, and is forecast to reach a value of $15.6 billion by 2019. Much of this growth will be fuelled by a high number of new, more efficacious and convenient products entering the market and commanding greater value compared to the therapies already in the market. The drugs driving this growth include once-daily LABA/LAMA fixed-dose combinations such as QVA-149, umeclidinium bromide/vilanterol and olodaterol/tiotropium.

Despite recent patent expirations, including that of Advair Diskus (salmeterol/fluticasone propionate), a market leader, generic erosion in the COPD market may not be as pronounced as that observed in other indications. This is largely down to the difficulty in replicating a fixed-dose combination therapy and the associated device. Indeed, since the US patent expired in 2010, Advair Diskus has faced little generic competition.

Although the COPD market is characterized by low diagnosis rates, campaigns to increase awareness of the disease in both patients and physicians has resulted in steadily rising diagnosis of COPD. Therefore, this has also contributed to market growth throughout the forecast period.

Why in Las Vegas, USA?

     With the of area of 352 km2, Las Vegas is a city in the United States, the most populous city in the state of Nevada, the county seat of Clark County, and the city proper of the Las Vegas Valley. The city bills itself as The Entertainment Capital of the World, and is the best place to let loose and have fun. Leave the world behind and immerse yourself in our endless entertainment options, world-famous restaurants, beautiful resorts and more shopping than you could do in a day. Las Vegas offers something to exceed your wildest expectations. A growing retirement and family city, Las Vegas is the 29th-most populous city in the United States, with a population of 603,488 at the 2013 United States Census Estimates. And, add a less-than-desirable ranking to Las Vegas’ portfolio: Las Vegas is in  top-10 ranking among the most polluted cities in the United States.